His Holiness Rael endorses Intelligent Design

| 5 Comments | 2 TrackBacks

Everybody better get down to Vegas. The International Raelian Movement is planning a press conference tomorrow.

Evidently, they've decided that (1) they actually have successfully cloned humans (wrong), (2) that this would be a good thing (wrong), and (3) that it would mean they've achieved eternal life (also wrong). According to yesterday's press release from the Raelians, His Holiness Rael (remember, the guy who saw an alien in 1973 and started the Raelian movement) will "reveal how the latest research on memory transfer technology associated with human cloning is on the verge of changing our society forever by ridding humans of the ultimate disease: death."

Rael: Strong ID supporter

So far we just have everyday, run-of-the-mill pseudoscience, worthy of a few chuckles to the patrons of the Panda's Thumb. Here's what brings guffaws:

His Holiness Rael draws the exceptional accuracy of his scientific and humanitarian vision from the Message He received in 1973 from the Elohim, a very advanced race of human beings from a distant planet within our galaxy. The Elohim created all life on Earth scientifically using DNA (including humans in their image) and were mistaken for God, which explains why the name Elohim is present in all original Bibles. The Bible is, in fact, an atheist book describing the scientific creation of life on Earth. The new concept of "Intelligent Design" fits perfectly with this explanation of our origins.

The best part is, the "mainstream" intelligent design advocates really can't logically object to the Raelian argument, even though you know they want to, deep down. After all, Intelligent Design advocates are always telling us that one cannot discover anything about the designer based on the design, and that aliens are an equally acceptable alternative.

If the aliens are super-advanced humans, so much the better. Just this possibility was pondered by Michael Behe in Darwin's Black Box, although he added time-travel into the mix:

Perhaps, then, biochemists in the future will send back cells to the early earth that contain the information for the irreducibly complex structures we observe today. In this scenario humans can be their own aliens, their own advanced civilization. Of course, time travel leads to apparent paradoxes (things like grandsons shooting grandfathers before their offspring are born), but at least some physicists are ready to accept them. Most people, like me, will find these scenarios entirely unsatisfactory, but they are vailable [sic] for those who wish to avoid unpleasant theological implications. [Behe, Darwin's Black Box, pp. 249-250, 1996]

Or, we could just go with the mainstream scientific explanation for biological complexity.

2 TrackBacks

P. Z. Myers at Pharyngula alerts me to a new variety of rubbish from our friends at the Discovery Institute: "ontogenetic depth". This notion, the brainchild of one Paul Nelson, is supposed to be a way of measuring the complexity... Read More

His Holiness Rael endorses Intelligent Design Nick Matzke posted Entry 31 on March 25, 2004 09:39 AM. Trackback URL: http://degas.fdisk.net/cgi-bin/mt/mt-tb.cgi/30... Read More

5 Comments

So, is Roger Zelazny receiving royalties from these fruitcakes? It seems he wrote a sci-fi novel in the late ‘60’s in which the settlers of a new planet came from “Urath” and adopted the personae of the various Hindu dieties in order to overawe their physical descendants. They, the gods, controlled the body shops at which their descendants could buy new bodies as the grew old into which they could send their consciousness. Sometime the gods would perpetrate cruel jokes by sending the conscousness into the bodies of gelded water buffaloes. Perhaps the Grand Rael should just admit he stole the whole idea from a scifi book and get a real job.

Syntax Error: not well-formed (invalid token) at line 3, column 11, byte 81 at /usr/local/lib/perl5/site_perl/5.12.3/mach/XML/Parser.pm line 187

Oh, yeah…Zelazny’s Lord of Light. Great book!

Yes, Lord of Light (link to my review). This quote from that seems most apt:

It is the difference between the unknown and the unknowable, between science and fantasy - it is a matter of essence. The four points of the compass be logic, knowledge, wisdom and the unknown. Some do bow in that final direction. Others advance upon it. To bow before the one is to lose sight of the three. I may submit to the unknown, but never to the unknowable. The man who bows in that final direction is either a saint or a fool. I have no use for either.

Yes, Lord of Light (link to my review). This quote from that seems most apt:

It is the difference between the unknown and the unknowable, between science and fantasy - it is a matter of essence. The four points of the compass be logic, knowledge, wisdom and the unknown. Some do bow in that final direction. Others advance upon it. To bow before the one is to lose sight of the three. I may submit to the unknown, but never to the unknowable. The man who bows in that final direction is either a saint or a fool. I have no use for either.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Nick Matzke published on March 25, 2004 9:39 AM.

Origin of “junk” DNA was the previous entry in this blog.

My Favorite Quotes from an ID Advocate is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Categories

Archives

Author Archives

Powered by Movable Type 4.361

Site Meter