Cats, candy, and evolution

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Here's a small taste of Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, a sweet story about a poor boy and his visit to an amazing candy factory…you've probably heard of it, since the new movie is getting a lot of press.

Only once a year, on his birthday, did Charlie Bucket ever get to taste a bit of chocolate. The whole family saved up their money for that special occasion, and when the great day arrived, Charlie was always presented with one small chocolate bar to eat all by himself. And each time he received it, on those marvelous birthday mornings, he would place it carefully in a small wooden box that he owned, and treasure it as though it were a bar of solid gold; and for the next few days, he would allow himself only to look at it, but never to touch it. Then at last, when he could stand it no longer, he would peel back a tiny bit of the paper wrapping at one corner to expose a tiny bit of chocolate, and then he would take a tiny nibble—just enough to allow the lovely sweet taste to spread out slowly over his tongue. The next day, he would take another tiny nibble, and so on, and so on. And in this way, Charlie would make his ten-cent bar of birthday chocolate last him for more than a month.stop

That's how it is published, at any rate. What if it read something like this?

Only once a year, on his birthday, did Charlie Bucket ever get to taste a bit of chocolate. The whole family saved up their money for that special occasion, and when the great day arrived, Charlie was always presented with one small chocolate bar to eat all by himself. And each time he received it, on those marvelg ynfg, jura ur pbhyq fgnaq vg ab ybatrstop, ur jbhyq stoprry onpx n gval ovg bs gur cncre jenccvat ng bar pbeare gb rkcbfr n gval ovg bs pubpbyngr, naq gura ur jbhyq gnxr n gval avooyr-whfg rabhtu gb nyybj gur ybiryl fjrrg gnfgr gb fcernq bhg fybjyl bire uvf gbathr. Gstopr arkg qnl, ur stopbhyq gnxr nabgure gval avooyr, naq fb ba, naq fb ba. Naq va guvf jnl, Puneyvr jstophyq znxr uvf gra-prag one bs oveguqnl pubpbyngr ynfg uvz sbe zber guna n zbagu.

Continue reading Cats, candy, and evolution (on Pharyngula)

6 Comments

The page is blank…

I think the site’s down - it was there earlier.

Sorry to hear it’s down - I’m sure it will be back up. It’s a very nice article.

There are some comments about diabetes (peripheral but somewhat related), and that may have generated a lot of search hits and extra traffic.

Yeah, sorry about that. Instapundit linked to one article yesterday, Atrios to another one today, and the server cannae take any more, Cap’n.

I did some hasty optimizations and disembowelments, and it’s holding up now. Fingers crossed, anyway.

Oh! Oh! Oh! I know!

The cat “kind” was vegetarian before the Fall of Adam, and undoubtedly ate sweet fruit. After the Fall, God disabled the TAS1R2 gene in all members of the cat “kind” to induce them to eat other animals.

And why did God perform exactly the same genetic surgery on so many species of cats? Maybe:

a) He was re-using the same successful technique in similar animals b) The cat “kind” evolved like crazy after the Flood

Anyway, if cats enjoyed sweets before the Fall, I can imagine that the ur-cat nipped a bit on the Fruit of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. That would explain their elegant/evil disposition!

(Hey. This is easy and fun. A lot easier than studying science textbooks. Maybe I can get my idea included in AiG.)

Well, if all cats have the mutation, then creationists will claim it as evidence that they’re all members of the cat “kind” that just underwent microevolution after the flood.

There’s no way that the creationist ministries are going to allow anything to be evidence for evolution, however much it is.

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This page contains a single entry by PZ Myers published on July 27, 2005 10:41 AM.

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