Postdocing in NC

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I’m in my final year of graduate school and plan to graduate with a Ph.D. in Genetics after spring semester. I recently lined up a postdoc working with Jeff Thorne at NC State. In case you are wondering, postdoc is short for “post-doctoral researcher”, which means that you have a doctorate, but are still working under a more senior scientist or academic, usually a professor at a research institution.

The postdoc is still many months away. I have to complete and defend my dissertation and survive teaching undergrads between now and then. My postdoctoral research will involve either Bayesian methods of estimating evolutionary parameters or developing models of sequence evolution that take into consideration three dimensional protein structure.

Anyway, since I will be moving to Raleigh early next summer, I’d like to put some feelers out about establishing a North Carolina Citizens for Science. Anybody interested?

10 Comments

NCSU WOOT WOOT!

Absolutely. Give me a holler when you arrive.

Reed,

I hope you don’t mind a question unrelated to your request.

In some of my work, we’ve been collecting genetic samples from a severely depressed population of sturgeon. Those samples are being subjected to PCR testing, primarily looking at microsats.

In a recent presentation, one of the geneticists stated that the data indicated the population was much less diverse than other sturgeon populations. I asked him the following question, but didn’t get a straight answer, so I’m asking you…

Given that microsats are non-coding short repeated segments, is it assumed that low diversity in microsats reflects an overall low genetic diversity? Or is it possible to have low microsat diversity but higher diversity in other genetic regions?

I’m asking this purely for my own curiosity. I have no reason to doubt the conclusions from this data set, since as I stated before, the population is severely depressed and has been for a number of years.

Thanks for your help.

Jason

Yes. I am interested in a North Carolina Citizens for Science.

Jason Wrote:

Given that microsats are non-coding short repeated segments, is it assumed that low diversity in microsats reflects an overall low genetic diversity? Or is it possible to have low microsat diversity but higher diversity in other genetic regions?

It is unlikely since microsats mutate quicker than other parts of the genome and thus on average are going to be more diverse than other regions.

Ah, so low diversity in microsat regions likely means really low diversity in the other regions.

Thank you Reed.

I would be very interested in such an association in NC.

You betcha. Add me to the list of Raleigh-area residents who would be interested.

NC in general, and Raleigh in particular, seem to be strangely overrepresented on this site.

I suggest a seasonal Bill Dembski Sucks Night at Mitch’s Tavern. Or we could regularly rotate the titles. The next one could be the Jay Richards Physics Extravaganza, then John Wells’s Moon over Darwin Party.

I live in Greensboro and would heartly support, in any way I can, such a group. I am a software developer by professional and can offer help in this area if needed.

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This page contains a single entry by Reed A. Cartwright published on August 10, 2005 4:39 PM.

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