Evolving spots, again and again

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flyspot_tease.jpg

It's all about style. When you're out and about looking for mates, what tends to draw the eye first are general signals—health and vigor, symmetry, absence of blemishes or injuries, that sort of thing—but then we also look for that special something, that je ne sais quoi, that dash of character and fashionable uniqueness. In humans, we see the pursuit of that elusive element in shifting fashions: hairstyles, clothing, and makeup change season by season in our efforts to stand out and catch the eye in subtle ways that do not distract from the more important signals of beauty and health.

Flies do the same thing, exhibiting genetic traits that draw the attention of the opposite sex, and while nowhere near as flighty as the foibles of human fashion, they do exhibit considerable variability. Changes in body pigmentation, courtship rituals, and pheromones are all affected by sexual selection, but one odd feature in particular is the presence of spots on the wing. Flies flash and vibrate their wings at prospective mates, so the presence or absence of wing spots can be a distinctive species-specific element in their evolution. One curious thing is that wing spots seem to be easy to lose and gain in a fly lineage, and species independently generate very similar pigment spots. What is it about these patterns that makes them simultaneously labile and frequently re-expressed?

Continue reading "Evolving spots, again and again" (on Pharyngula)

3 Comments

Beautiful, seems that convergence may have simpler explanations than the supernatural after all.

Beauty?

Explain how this can be a signal in and of itself.

Apparent health is one thing, but what is beauty other than that which is in the eye of the beholder?

But, it’s still a fly. ;)

Henry

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This page contains a single entry by PZ Myers published on April 21, 2006 1:16 PM.

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