Convergent evolution of a gene that blocks HIV in monkeys

| 30 Comments

Here we have yet another example of evolution cobbling together new proteins from existing structures. And what do you know, it kinda matters:

The TRIM5-CypA gene found in Asian macaques is a hybrid of two existing proteins, TRIM5 and CypA. This combination creates a single protein that blocks infections by lentiviruses.

Continue reading at Neurotopia for more snark.

30 Comments

Wow.

So then, this mutant protein can no longer bind to the receptors on lentivirus protein coats?

This throws a big monkeywrench into Behe’s “two-protein binding site” nonsense

Stanton:

Wow.

So then, this mutant protein can no longer bind to the receptors on lentivirus protein coats?

This throws a big monkeywrench into Behe’s “two-protein binding site” nonsense

I clicked on the link but there was only a summary there as well. Too bad, I need a lot more information than that to try and figure out what some of that means.

What do you mean by - Behe’s Two Protein nonsense - ??

Stacy S.:

What do you mean by - Behe’s Two Protein nonsense - ??

Behe making a fool of himself on the radio:

…And I said such things could happen [useful defects such as sickle cell binding sites], and I said the limit for Darwinian evolution was two connected protein-protein binding sites. That is, if you need three proteins to do something, and each pair of proteins has to be connected by a site; you need two protein binding sites—I said that would be, based on the data that I talk about in the book _The Edge of Evolution_ that’s the most you could expect out of Darwinian processes.

But again, you would expect that to happen because the odds against a single binding site popping up are not that prohibitive. But if you need two binding sites together to do something than that’s what I said in my book was prohibitive. Since most molecular machines in the cell consist of aggregates of a dozen proteins or so, each of which have to bind very specifically to each other, that means that most of the protein machinery in the cell is well beyond Darwinian evolution.

Well, she mis-read the book.

Where he refers to the chapter, “The Two-Binding-Site Rule,” in his book, “The Edge of Evolution,” while taking a potshot at ERV.

Obviously, these macaques did not bother to read that chapter.

What, they didn’t read chapter and verse? Fer shame!

Thanks IDers for helping out with the battle for, oh, curing diseases and for advancing the science that can do it. And thanks for lots of other stuff too! Thanks a lot!

Behe Wrote:

Well, she mis-read the book

No, she read the book. Several times Behe writes that HIV has zero binding sites. Abbie showed that HIV evolved at least 3 protein-protein binding sites in the space of 10 years. Importantly, one of the binding sites results in a novel structure, an ion channel. This sinks Behe’s argument. See the Open Letter series for details.

This particular paper Evolution of a TRIM5-CypA Splice Isoform in Old World Monkeys has no relevance to Behe’s arguments though. In this case, insertion of a Cyclophilin element makes the anti-HIV protein TRIM5alpha inactive. This explains why Pig tailed Macaques are the only primate apart from humans susceptible to HIV (see Liao CH, et al., A novel fusion gene, TRIM5-Cyclophilin A in the pig-tailed macaque determines its susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. AIDS. 2007 Dec;21 Suppl 8:S19-26.)

The TRIM5CypA fusion protein in New Word Owl monkeys is relevant. This fusion protein does bind to and block HIV in a very efficient manner. This protein shows how far Behe is from reality. In this particular case a protein gains a new binding site by a copy of another proteins binding site being fused to it (this happens a lot). Cyclophilin A already binds to the HIV capsid. the TRIM5CypA fusion protein can bind very efficiently to HIV, bringing the anti-HIV TRIM5 to it’s target. See Nisole S, et al., A Trim5-cyclophilin A fusion protein found in owl monkey kidney cells can restrict HIV-1. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Sep 7;101(36):13324-8. AND it effectivley forms multimers, which the original TRIM5 doesn’t (Virology. 2007 Oct 10;367(1):19-29. Epub 2007 Jun 15. The ability of multimerized cyclophilin A to restrict retrovirus infection. Javanbakht H, Diaz-Griffero F, Yuan W, Yeung DF, Li X, Song B, Sodroski J.)

Behe has no idea what he is talking about, but the current paper is not relevant to his misunderstandings. It does led to lots and lots of relevant papers though.

Abbey should have read the book.

Thanks Stanton :-) I’m pretty sure you answered my question (I just need to learn a little more about biology - I think this one is over my head, but I appreciate the effort! )

My comment disappeared :-( - anyway …

Thanks Stanton:-) I THINK you answered my question, but I’m pretty sure I have a little more biology to learn before I will comprehend it!

Alright - someone is just playing with me now!

Ian, I only mentioned Behe, in that, in another thread, someone brought it to my attention that Behe spoke of how evolution can not occur because for mutations to occur simultaneously in 2, 3 or more proteins with intimately related functions (i.e., a receptor binding site) is, according to Behe, astronomically low, in a snide attempt to silence my criticism, as well as to denigrate Miss ERV for no apparent reason, as well.

And with this particular post, I also noticed that Mother Nature often has a diabolically cruel way of thumbing her nose at people who make bold statements grounded in ignorance.

Stacy, whatever you do, do not read any of Behe’s books. There are plenty of other books on cell biology competently written by ACTUAL BIOLOGISTS, available. Granted, they are expensive, but, they are worth every penny.

I’d actually tell you to go ahead and read Behe’s books, so you can see what bad biology looks like.

Ethan Rop:

I’d actually tell you to go ahead and read Behe’s books, so you can see what bad biology looks like.

That’s like beginning a medical student’s education by taking him or her out on a fieldtrip to look at roadkilled raccoons and opossums.

Stanton: This throws a big monkeywrench into Behe’s “two-protein binding site” nonsense

Sheesh, you Darwinists. You keep whining about “there are no testable predictions, blah blah blah,” then when an ID researcher goes ahead and makes a testable prediction, you still whine. Looks like if you’re a design proponent, you’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t.

(Not bad, huh? I’m faxing my resume over to the Discovery Institute on Monday.)

MPW:

Stanton: This throws a big monkeywrench into Behe’s “two-protein binding site” nonsense

Sheesh, you Darwinists. You keep whining about “there are no testable predictions, blah blah blah,” then when an ID researcher goes ahead and makes a testable prediction, you still whine. Looks like if you’re a design proponent, you’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t.

(Not bad, huh? I’m faxing my resume over to the Discovery Institute on Monday.)

Just make sure that you cut off your feet in order to ensure that you will never be able to set foot into a laboratory again. Intelligent Design proponents eat over-extravagant self-flagellation up like marked down Easter candy.

Ian Musgrave: This explains why Pig tailed Macaques are the only primate apart from humans susceptible to HIV

Hmm. I wonder why the CIA designed HIV to go against Pig-Tailed Macaques as well. The conspiracy deepens…

All right, realistically, what book is recommended for Stacy that covers Behe’s area?

Pete Dunkelberg:

All right, realistically, what book is recommended for Stacy that covers Behe’s area?

There’s Cell and Molecular Biology: Concepts and Experiments Cell and Molecular Biology: Concepts and Experiments by Gerald Karp, on sale at Amazon for $137.95 ($62 used) I used this as the textbook for a Molecular Biology class I took last fall.

And then there’s Molecular Biology Made Simple and Fun, Third Edition by David P. Clark, on sale at Amazon for $49.95.

Stanton:

And then there’s Molecular Biology Made Simple and Fun, Third Edition by David P. Clark, on sale at Amazon for $49.95.

That’s more in my price range! I’ll check on that one - Thanks :-)

Or, if you want, I can sell you my copy for $50

Jesus, in his love sent AIDS to remind us that buggery is not the right thing to do, yet mankind kept on doing it. Now Jesus has sent global warming to melt the power ice caps to wash away all the buggers living in the world’s coastal cities.

In addition, which one of these monkeys had a baby human. Until that happens, all of this is still just micro-evolution, and the Bahrmin level remains unchanged!

Aaaarrgghh! P.G. obviously doesn’t have any sympathy for innocent babies that are born with this disease. What an asshole!

A BIG Thanks to ALL scientists who are obviously working very hard and getting close too finding a cure! :-)

Pole Greaser:

Jesus, in his love sent AIDS to remind us that buggery is not the right thing to do, yet mankind kept on doing it. Now Jesus has sent global warming to melt the power ice caps to wash away all the buggers living in the world’s coastal cities.

Hmmmm.… Let’s see… New for 49.95 or used for 50.00 … - Decisions, decisions…

Stanton:

Or, if you want, I can sell you my copy for $50

Hey Stacy, Did you pray for guidance? ;-) And don’t forget postage.

Rrr:

Hey Stacy, Did you pray for guidance? ;-) And don’t forget postage.

Umm - no. Was I supposed to?

I ordered it “used” at Amazon for $18.00 :-)

Sorry Stanton :-(

I guess you know best then. :-)

Syntax Error: mismatched tag at line 9, column 190, byte 622 at /usr/local/lib/perl5/site_perl/5.12.3/mach/XML/Parser.pm line 187

PNAS has several papers on this. The macaque TRIMCyp makes it vulnerable to HIV-1, but inhibits infection by several other lentiviruses. It’s still a protein worth evolving, at least for the millions of years before humans started using them for HIV research. (sorry about the syntax in the last post.)

Stacy: ignore Grease. It’s a content-free troll. You will never see anything worth commenting on under that name.

I thought Pole just forgot the sarcasm tags.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Ethan Rop published on February 29, 2008 10:12 AM.

Which one of you little rascals Sokaled AiG? was the previous entry in this blog.

Thar’s bacteria in that there snow! is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Categories

Archives

Author Archives

Powered by Movable Type 4.361

Site Meter