Stagmomantis carolina

| 25 Comments

Stagmomantis carolina — Carolina mantis

25 Comments

That’s a great forced perspective shot! My first glance made me think, “HUGE MANTIS!!!” What radioactive hot-spot did that creature arrive from?

Proving why its essential to light parking lots at night.

“I’m convinced that we’re dealing with a Mantis in whose geological world the smallest insects were as large as man, and now failing to find those insects as food, well… it’s doing the best that it can.”

Please check the link in the photo; it is still connected to the Banded Tussock Moth.

HA! I see your ruse!

Sneaking in a Praying Mantis, Huh?! Cleverly designed blur the edges between…

Um, what? That’s preying?

Oh, nevermind.

If this is a example of insect gymnastics, where are the other photos of it’s parallel bar routine? How else are we to gauge what score to give it?

Thus proving that they will hire anyone they can get to return carts on the night shift at Walmart.

Ducklike said:

Please check the link in the photo; it is still connected to the Banded Tussock Moth.

Fixed

Our Giant Insect Overlords have arrived at last! ;-)

There’s a Brian Aldiss story about this… ‘cept his was much, much bigger.

EastwoodDC said:

Our Giant Insect Overlords have arrived at last! ;-)

As predicted by ID. ;)

Burt I Gordon would be proud. (Or ashamed!)

Our Giant Insect Overlords have arrived at last! ;-)

Only to suffocate due to our oxygen-poor atmosphere… :D

You call that big? Why, I saw an Hawaiian Mantis on my outside elementary school cafeteria wall back in the early ’60s that was three times that size. All the guys just looked at it and the girls freaked out. Now, THAT was a Mantis!

Loved looking at them ever since. Nice pic.

Sorry. Should be *Bert* I Gordon: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bert_I._Gordon

That Mantis is an elderly one. SEE, it is using a walker.:)

stevaroni: Actually, praying mantis is more correct, because they look like they are praying. There’s even a species called Mantis religiosa.

Actually, praying mantis is more correct, because they look like they are praying.

Or, in extreme cases, evangelizing.…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:[…]nse_pose.JPG

I have these all over my garden. It’s awesome! The only creepy crawly thing I like better is the Halloween spider. We get lots of those too!

Stacy S. said:

I have these all over my garden. It’s awesome! The only creepy crawly thing I like better is the Halloween spider. We get lots of those too!

Halloween spider?

You mean the golden orb weavers Araneus diadematus and A. trifolium?

Yes! Golden Orb! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:IMG_3575.jpg

We start noticing them in October.

I believe there is a bug in your perspective.

Stacy S. said:

Yes! Golden Orb! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:IMG_3575.jpg

I would like to know if that was the one I saw while canoing in Texas, but the reported dimensions are wrong:

2,040×2,640 (2.17 MB)

:-\

[Actually, the body and web sizes seems to match, as well as the locale. Thanks for helping me identify the genus/species!]

If you encounter a golden-orb spider in her web and you have access to the side she is not resting on, and if you want to, you can do this:

Take a small twig, or use a finger, and slowly approach the lady of the house from below (from her prospective) and very delicately touch her on her–er–belly. A very light stroke along her (impressive!) abdomen. Repeat a few times.

Now, I have no idea what will happen to you and you assume your own risk, of course, but when I tried that the spider at first tensed slightly, then seemed to relax and allowed repeated contact. I was quite amazed. She appeared flattered, if not a bit bashful.

True story. Sarasota County, Florida, a summer from the 70s.

I’ll take a picture when they start coming out and post it on my blog … but I’m NOT going to TOUCH it! … Yikes!

Where’s Peter Parker when ya need ‘em, huh?

Henry

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This page contains a single entry by Reed A. Cartwright published on September 15, 2008 12:00 PM.

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