Carnegiea gigantea

| 15 Comments
SaguaroCactus.jpg

Carnegiea gigantea — Saguaro cactus, Superstition Mountains, Arizona.

15 Comments

Whenever I visit my mother in Tucson AZ, I almost always find time to visit the Saguaro National Park, just northwest of Tucson - http://www.americansouthwest.net/ar[…]al_park.html - highly recommended. Among many other interesting things about these giant cacti, they are pollinated by bats and birds and bees.

Dear Paul,

I agree with your recommendation (The park itself is comprised of two parts; a section due East of Tucson, and then the other section that straddles Gates Pass.). I think one of the loveliest vistas I have seen - out of quite a few I have seen in AZ itself - is from Gates Pass:

Paul Burnett said:

Whenever I visit my mother in Tucson AZ, I almost always find time to visit the Saguaro National Park, just northwest of Tucson - http://www.americansouthwest.net/ar[…]al_park.html - highly recommended. Among many other interesting things about these giant cacti, they are pollinated by bats and birds and bees.

Regards,

John

I live in Tucson,try a visit to “Sabino Canyon” if you can, http://www.sabinocanyon.com/,it’s just down the road from the University of Arizona.It has a tram tour, or you can hike the many trails.Watch out for the Mountain Lions,they enjoy the taste of a tender tourist!!!!

Hi IVORYGIRL,

I agree with your assessment of Sabino Canyon:

IVORYGIRL said:

I live in Tucson,try a visit to “Sabino Canyon” if you can, http://www.sabinocanyon.com/,it’s just down the road from the University of Arizona.It has a tram tour, or you can hike the many trails.Watch out for the Mountain Lions,they enjoy the taste of a tender tourist!!!!

However, I’d add Mount Lemmon to my list of scenic wonders near Tucson too (Moreover, Sabino Canyon isn’t “just down the road from the University of Arizona”. It’s quite a hike walking or biking or driving-wise.).

Regards,

John

(A former Old Pueblo resident)

People tend to think of the desert as a sort of barren wasteland, but it can be very beautiful. There are wonderful hiking experiences to be had all over southern AZ, in addition to the great ones mentioned above. And you get sunsets like that almost every day. Get there in late March and you might see the amazing poppy explosion. - Mike Z (also a former Sonora Desert resident)

IVORYGIRL said: …try a visit to “Sabino Canyon”

I was there 6 or 8 years ago, and then it burned down. I haven’t been back since. I take it it’s open again?

Another place I want go to but haven’t yet is the Kitt Peak Observatory.

Mike Z said:

And you get sunsets like that almost every day.

I have only been in that area a couple of times and both were during the late autumn. I was amazed by the sunsets and part of me is disappointed to hear that they are like that year-round… Not really, but you know what I mean.

Dear KP,

This is exactly what I miss about Arizona:

KP said:

Mike Z said:

And you get sunsets like that almost every day.

I have only been in that area a couple of times and both were during the late autumn. I was amazed by the sunsets and part of me is disappointed to hear that they are like that year-round… Not really, but you know what I mean.

As a photographer, I fell in love with Arizona’s beautiful, breathtaking skies, especially at sunset. Seeing the sun set at the Grand Canyon or at Gates Pass, are sights I will never, ever, forget.

John

Paul: Sabino was damaged a little but it is back to it’s former beauty.With out giving to much away, I work at the Steward Observatory and we provide tours on Tuesdays and Fridays. Kitt Peak and Mt Graham are also open for tours.

Hi John: I would say its all a matter of preception,I ride my bike from campus to Sabino twice a week. Ever visited Madeira Canyon? That’s another lovley spot!!

Leslie

Hi Leslie,

Paul might have been referring to Mount Lemmon. I was stunned to hear that Summerhaven was quite literally burned to a crisp.

IVORYGIRL said:

Paul: Sabino was damaged a little but it is back to it’s former beauty.With out giving to much away, I work at the Steward Observatory and we provide tours on Tuesdays and Fridays. Kitt Peak and Mt Graham are also open for tours.

Hi John: I would say its all a matter of preception,I ride my bike from campus to Sabino twice a week. Ever visited Madeira Canyon? That’s another lovley spot!!

Leslie

I went to Madeira Canyon once eons ago. If you’re over at EEB, please be sure to give my regards to Mike R. the next time you see him.

Cheers,

John

John Kwok Wrote:

Seeing the sun set at the Grand Canyon or at Gates Pass, are sights I will never, ever, forget.

Same here. Even in daylight, the many colors of the exposed strata were breathtaking. I often say that, while I have had some interest in evolution and natural history for over 40 years, it was my 1989 hike of the Grand Canyon that kicked it into high gear. For years afterwards I could not read enough about the various geologic eras/periods/epochs that produced such a sight, and an amazing diversity of life. It wasn’t until 1997 that I was aware of ID and OEC, or that most major religions accepted evolution and an old Earth, but that trip set the stage.

I guess it’s a C. P. Snow “two cultures” thing, but it’s frustrating to me that so many people can marvel at the sight, but couldn’t care less about how long it took for those layers to accumulate, or for the river to cut through them, let alone the evolution of life during that time.

Frank J said:

…it’s frustrating to me that so many people can marvel at the sight, but couldn’t care less about how long it took for those layers to accumulate, or for the river to cut through them, let alone the evolution of life during that time.

Hear, hear!

Think you that the rounded rock marked with parallel scratches calls up as much poetry in an ignorant mind as in the mind of a geologist, who knows that over this rock a glacier slid a million years ago? The truth is, that those who have never entered upon scientific pursuits know not a tithe of the poetry by which they are surrounded.

— Herbert Spencer, “What knowledge is of most worth?” in Essays on Education and Kindred Subjects (J.M. Dent, London, 1911).

When I visit the amazing Clifton Gorge of southwest Ohio, I see not only the sublime cliffs and ferns and waterfalls, I see also (in my mind’s eye) the torrents of water from a melting glacier, and the long and continuing series of investigations that led to the human understanding of ice ages.

When I look at the stars, I see not only their patterns and their colors, I see also (in my mind’s eye) the nuclear reactions, the neutrinos, the helium flash, and the unsolved problems of dark matter and dark energy.

When I look at a hummingbird, I see not only the bright flash and quick wings, I see also (in my mind’s eye) the flex of muscle, the motion of actinomyosin, the ATP-ADP chemical reactions, the long evolutionary history from procaryote to single-celled eucaryote to Tiktaalik to dinosaur to hummingbird, as well as the long and continuing human history of trying to decipher that evolutionary history.

Why do creationists want to believe in such a prosaic universe that their version of God can only perform circus tricks, and not the miracles that we see around us every day?

Is it true that a saguaro is about 70 to 80 years old before it begins to grow its first branch?

Hi Dan,

‘Tis a great post:

Dan said:

Frank J said:

…it’s frustrating to me that so many people can marvel at the sight, but couldn’t care less about how long it took for those layers to accumulate, or for the river to cut through them, let alone the evolution of life during that time.

Hear, hear!

Think you that the rounded rock marked with parallel scratches calls up as much poetry in an ignorant mind as in the mind of a geologist, who knows that over this rock a glacier slid a million years ago? The truth is, that those who have never entered upon scientific pursuits know not a tithe of the poetry by which they are surrounded.

— Herbert Spencer, “What knowledge is of most worth?” in Essays on Education and Kindred Subjects (J.M. Dent, London, 1911).

When I visit the amazing Clifton Gorge of southwest Ohio, I see not only the sublime cliffs and ferns and waterfalls, I see also (in my mind’s eye) the torrents of water from a melting glacier, and the long and continuing series of investigations that led to the human understanding of ice ages.

When I look at the stars, I see not only their patterns and their colors, I see also (in my mind’s eye) the nuclear reactions, the neutrinos, the helium flash, and the unsolved problems of dark matter and dark energy.

When I look at a hummingbird, I see not only the bright flash and quick wings, I see also (in my mind’s eye) the flex of muscle, the motion of actinomyosin, the ATP-ADP chemical reactions, the long evolutionary history from procaryote to single-celled eucaryote to Tiktaalik to dinosaur to hummingbird, as well as the long and continuing human history of trying to decipher that evolutionary history.

Why do creationists want to believe in such a prosaic universe that their version of God can only perform circus tricks, and not the miracles that we see around us every day?

You’ve stated eloquently how and why a firm understanding of mainstream science can yield to a substantially more fulfilling emotional understanding of the universe than any form of creationism - including Intelligent Design creationism - can render. Maybe if we all started to talk vividly in such terms, we could be more persuasive to intellectually-challenged acolytes of the Dishonesty Institute, ICR, AiG and other organizations of their ilk who’ve substituted blind obediance to the likes of Dembski and Ham, among others, in lieu of clear, rational thinking.

Appreciatively yours,

John

Dan and everyone:

A similar sentiment was expressed by Richard, P. Feynman.

I had a lovely time there, Labor day, 2001. Me and the GF took the night tour of the museum. A tarantula crawled 3 feet ahead of us, and there were fluorescent scorpions 6” from where my butt was perched on a wall. Also you could buy 50lb bags of NH4NO3 at the florist’s. Probably not any more.

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on December 15, 2008 12:00 PM.

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