Periophthalmus chrysospilos

| 17 Comments

Photo by Kelly Lyon, http://kellylyonphotography.com.

MudSkippers.jpg

Periophthalmus chrysospilos–Indonesian mudskipper. Specimens courtesy of Denver Zoo.

17 Comments

You’re not the pro shooter I ran into in front of the DZ marmoset exhibit, are you? I told one of my fave old stories about an Army NCO I knew whose wife and pet squirrel monkey didn’t get along at ALL.

Cheers – MrG / http://www.vectorsite.net/gblog.html

Matt,

Please convey my compliments to Kelly Lyon. This is even better than the Gorilla photograph that you posted recently.

BTW I recently finished reading your ID volume co-written with Taner Edis, and hope to write a suitable Amazon.com review by early next week.

Best,

John

Thanks for the question and the comment. I forwarded the URL to Kelly and invited her to respond.

BTW I recently finished reading your ID volume co-written with Taner Edis, and hope to write a suitable Amazon.com review by early next week.

Many thanks - I’ll look forward to reading it.

It’s butt-ugly critters like these that lead me to question the intelligence of the Intelligent Designer. [grin]

And in today’s “Where are they now” segment…

After he left Ren & Stimpy on strained terms, Muddy was never really able to ignite the solo career he thought he deserved.

Muddy admits had some rough times in the late 90’s, as he lost the spotlight to younger transitionals, like Tiktalik, but he’s cleaned himself up and now he’s a spokesman for an online dating service.

(Nobody under 35 is going to know who “Muddy the Mudskipper” was, so if that’s you, just ignore my diseased rantings)

Are these critters related to the ones featured at the end of this commercial?

I’m reminded of a little church near Waterloo, NY. Their board out front said “Fish don’t walk - Jesus saves.” I was sorely tempted to post a picture of a mudskipper on their door.…

Cheryl Shepherd-Adams said:

Are these critters related to the ones featured at the end of this commercial?

Awesome! Love Guinness, too!

Oh no! The creationists’ worst nightmare: a walking fish! This is a great photo, my compliments to Kelly Lyon!

If I’m not mistaken, these fine little fellows have split or dual pupils. When floating atop the water with their heads raised, half the eye his above water and half below. Their unique eye structure allows them to observe the world above the interface of air and water and below it simultaneously.

How cool is that?

Crudely Wrott said:

If I’m not mistaken, these fine little fellows have split or dual pupils. When floating atop the water with their heads raised, half the eye his above water and half below. Their unique eye structure allows them to observe the world above the interface of air and water and below it simultaneously.

How cool is that?

You’re thinking of the four-eyed fish of Central America, Anableps, which is a close relative of guppies and mollies.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anableps

Mudskippers, by contrast, are a subfamily of gobies.

It’s very clear that sea and land animals are entirely separate creations; a transitional form between them is _inconceivable_ … in the Vezzini sense :)

Oh, I was mistaken. That happened once before.

Thanks, Stanton, for the straight poop. ;^)

Crudely Wrott said:

Oh, I was mistaken. That happened once before.

Thanks, Stanton, for the straight poop. ;^)

Please don’t mention the scatfish.

OK. I will not mention it.

But did you hear the one about the constipated jitterbug? Yeah, he couldn’t jitt.

I bet those guys are tasty.

This is one of the best exhibits in any zoo. Some zoos will spend ten’s of millions of dollars over many acres and not accomplish what this exhibit does in about 30 square feet! It recreates the edge of a tidal flat where the skippers are constantly active. Males are building their mud/sand display “forts” between “high tides”. They constantly flag their dorsal fin at their neighbor and frequently jump into the adjacent “fort” for a territorial tussle. What you see is explained by excellent graphics. All the activity is captivating. An engaging feature of the exhibit is that is open - no obvious barriers separating the viewers. If you were an interpreter at this exhibit, what could you say about evolution? Rick, if you are a reader I tip my hat. David

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on February 2, 2009 12:00 PM.

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