Endless Forms at Cambridge

| 5 Comments

The Fitzwilliam Museum at Cambridge University has opened an exhibition called Endless Forms: Charles Darwin, Natural Science and the Visual Arts.

It brings together a fascinating range of paintings, drawings, watercolours, prints, photographs and sculptures, from collections of major galleries and museums in Europe and America. Some of the paintings are by famous artists such as Turner, Frederick Church and the French Impressionists. Other spectacular works by lesser-known artists such as Bruno Liljefors, Félicien Rops and American landscapists will be a revelation to visitors. Art works will be seen in juxtaposition with scientific material of all sorts, from geological maps and botanical teaching diagrams to fossils, minerals, and ornithological specimens. They reveal the many interactions between natural science and art during this period.

To accompany the exhibition there will be a series of podcasts and slide shows, the first two of which are up. Highly recommended.

Hat tip to Dispersal of Darwin, also recommended.

5 Comments

RBH,

I believe that this may be the very show that the Yale Center for British Art had had earlier this spring. I forgot about it completely, and when I did remember, I realized that I couldn’t get up to New Haven in time before it closed.

Best,

John

When I first read that headline I thought it was referring to the administrative burden of working in a university!

John - Yes, it is the same exhibit at Yale and The Fitzwilliam Museum. I am going to Cambridge in July, and will get to see the exhibit myself!

Richard - Thanks for the mention of my blog!

Michael,

That’s absolutely great:

Michael D. Barton said:

John - Yes, it is the same exhibit at Yale and The Fitzwilliam Museum. I am going to Cambridge in July, and will get to see the exhibit myself!

Richard - Thanks for the mention of my blog!

Now I am metaphorically kicking myself for missing it when I had the chance. At least the Peabody Museum of Natural History has a Darwin commemorative exhibit that should be up for the remainder of the summer.

Cheers,

John

Chris Lawson said:

When I first read that headline I thought it was referring to the administrative burden of working in a university!

Even if I spelled “dispersal” wrong? I just noticed that and fixed it.

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This page contains a single entry by Richard B. Hoppe published on June 5, 2009 8:08 PM.

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