Painted Hills

| 14 Comments

Photograph by Michael Klaas.

Photography contest, finalist in the “Minerals” category.

Klaas.Painted Hills.jpg

Painted Hills – exposed strata of geological eras when this section of Central Oregon was a river floodplain. Colors are formed by layers of volcanic deposits that fell from eruptions in the Cascade Range 35 million years ago. John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon.

14 Comments

Pretty

Essentially the same picture with the viewpoint slightly to the left at http://www.gcollier.com/John-Day-Fossil-Beds.html - another one zoomed back at http://cache.virtualtourist.com/121[…]ate_Park.jpg

There’s what looks like a road just out of the picture to the left, so this picture’s scale is probably one or two thousand feet wide.

If there is voting for a winner by readers then this one gets mine.

My entry (sadly but understandably, given the 6 finalists, not a finalist) showed, among other features, some faults. In this photo, in addition to the sedimentary and volcanic beds, I think I also see a pretty cool reverse fault in the background. Note the way that the two reddish beds, the 3 thin black beds below, and the tan beds between them are offset, with the ones on the right being pushed up and over the ones on the left.

Michael Klaas, am I seeing this correctly?

I love visible geologic structures like this. Really shows the power of the moving Earth.

It wuz teh Flud what did it.

I wanna complain.

There’s a fault in this image!

For me, the most impressive features in this photo are the preserved soil horizons. The reddish layers are probably ancient Oxisols (or lateritic soils) formed under subtropical conditions. The first one was buried and then another formed on top of it. The dark layers below may be organic horizons formed in a swampy environment. Gives one a feel for the long, varied history preserved in this view.

GvlGeologist, FCD said: Note the way that the two reddish beds, the 3 thin black beds below, and the tan beds between them are offset, with the ones on the right being pushed up and over the ones on the left.

Wow. That’s cool. And quite obvious once it’s it’s pointed out. I like the way the lower bands on the right line up perfectly with the upper layers on the left.

What are you talking about? These were all deposited during the Flood!

Seriously, this kind of observation is kind of hard to explain in a Diluvian framework, isn’t it! When some of our resident YECs (or other creationists) complain about “same facts, different viewpoints (as was discussed in another thread), this is the kind of thing I think of.

colluvial said:

For me, the most impressive features in this photo are the preserved soil horizons. The reddish layers are probably ancient Oxisols (or lateritic soils) formed under subtropical conditions. The first one was buried and then another formed on top of it. The dark layers below may be organic horizons formed in a swampy environment. Gives one a feel for the long, varied history preserved in this view.

GvlGeologist, FCD said:

My entry (sadly but understandably, given the 6 finalists, not a finalist) showed, among other features, some faults. In this photo, in addition to the sedimentary and volcanic beds, I think I also see a pretty cool reverse fault in the background. Note the way that the two reddish beds, the 3 thin black beds below, and the tan beds between them are offset, with the ones on the right being pushed up and over the ones on the left.

Michael Klaas, am I seeing this correctly?

I love visible geologic structures like this. Really shows the power of the moving Earth.

Wow. Thanks for pointing that out. I have to admit that I had even missed it, but you’re absolutely correct. I went back to my photos to see if I have another one with more detail, but this is the only one I have of that feature. Cool!

Michael Klaas said: I went back to my photos to see if I have another one with more detail, but this is the only one I have of that feature.

The two pictures I pointed out above (second message) show the same offset fault. Here’s a much higher resolution oblique view from the left, but there isn’t as obvious a fault line:

http://www.searchpictures.net/natur[…]oregon_2.jpg

Here’s more where the offset is more obvious:

http://cache2.asset-cache.net/xc/70[…]760B0D811297

http://geography.howstuffworks.com/[…]monument.htm

http://ranbo.smugmug.com/gallery/55[…]239355_UmJz2

The Curmudgeon said:

It wuz teh Flud what did it.

Yup. Last Thursday was one busy day. ;-)

Seriously, one thing I can’t emphasize enough is to mention when all these geological and biological events occurred. We have dates for countless events, and the uncertainties are steadily decreasing, while the scam artists’ and their trained parrots steadily backpedal from even speculating when events might have occurred. These days nothing puts them on the defensive better than forcing them to take a position on the “whens.”

you should have a contest on galaxy photos,they ar a buety on their own.

GvlGeologist, FCD said: Note the way that the two reddish beds, the 3 thin black beds below, and the tan beds between them are offset, with the ones on the right being pushed up and over the ones on the left.

I have to chime in and also add my thanks for pointing that out. I would have not noticed it, I would have seen the bands and looked past what they meant, but seeing that greatly adds to the photo for me.

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on August 15, 2009 12:00 PM.

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