Sorbus aucuparia

| 14 Comments

Photograph by Kari Tikkanen.

Photography contest, Honorable Mention.

Tikkanen.European_Rowan.jpg

Sorbus aucuparia–European Rowan, or Mountain Ash

14 Comments

Hi Kari, I love this photo and am wondering if I could get it in higher resolution - to use it as a screensaver, no commercial use intended.

The Wikipedia article mentions that in the UK the “wiggen tree” has been used as “an anti-witching device.”

I’ll admit to not being surprised …

A beautiful, atmospheric, photograph typical of some of the mornings we are having here (England, West Midlands). Sorbus aucuparia is far better known in the UK as “Mountain Ash” or less commonly as “Rowan”. I note the only reference to “wiggen tree” given in Wiki is to a couple of 19th century articles on witchcraft.

I presume the common name comes because the leaves have a resemblance to ash. The mountain will come from its ecology:

“Rowan is very tolerant of cold and is often found at high altitude on mountains; in the UK it occurs at up to 1 000 m altitude, higher than any other tree, and in France up to 2 000 m.”

(Wiki)

Interesting article from the Royal Botanic Gardens (Kew):

http://apps.kew.org/trees/?page_id=125

But where is… “The Larch?”

But where is… “The Larch?”

That’s slide number 1.

Sorbus aucuparia is far better known in the UK as “Mountain Ash” or less commonly as “Rowan”.

Thanks! I’ve added that to the caption.

But where is… “The Larch?”

It’s here (as stevaroni said):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRKVXG3DV-I

Sorry to be a pain, but the Kew article seems to correct the Wiki article (quelle suprise). Wiki says, “ … higher than any other tree …”. It should read “ … [higher than] any British broadleafed tree …”.

I would rather trust the Kew than Wiki but it serves me right in not reading my own contribution carefully enough.

[Matt: Thank you for adding to the caption, that was courteous of you.]

That’s no Mountain Ash. This is a Mountain Ash… http://treeswatercarbon.org/files/i[…]in%20Ash.jpg

Note how round, strong and erect it is… umm, excuse me for a sec…

The tree in Kari’s photo is what I’ve always heard referred to as a Mountain Ash, mostly by my mom. This is the one that gets bright red berries on it in the fall, yeah?

That tree in twisted_colour’s link has bark like an arbutus, but they’re usually… well, twisted.

According to Wikipedia, incidentally, the American mountain ash is Sorbus americana, evidently a closely related species.

fnxtr said:

The tree in Kari’s photo is what I’ve always heard referred to as a Mountain Ash, mostly by my mom. This is the one that gets bright red berries on it in the fall, yeah?

That tree in twisted_colour’s link has bark like an arbutus, but they’re usually… well, twisted.

This is why Linnaeus was invented.… :)

Kari’s photo doesn’t show the leaves in enough detail for identification purposes, but her tree looks much more like the mountain ash by my front gate than Twisted_Colour’s does.

btw they grow thick and beautiful in BC, too.

Thanks for comments. This species really gets red berries here in the fall.

Here is another rowan later in October:

http://www.kuvaboxi.fi/mediaobjects[…]8725orig.jpg

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on October 5, 2009 12:00 PM.

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