Meleagris gallopavo

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Turkeys_600.jpg

Meleagris gallopavo–domesticated turkey.

No, it’s not exactly a bird sanctuary; it’s an egg farm in Brittany, where they don’t actually know from Thanksgiving. The turkey is about to be inseminated (artificially, that is) by the male Homo sapiens.

11 Comments

Did the photographer get free samples?

In Spanish (as I know it) a wild turkey is a guajalote, while a tame turkey is a pavo.

Did the photographer get free samples?

Considering the proximate event is a turkey insemination, did he really want free samples?

The turkeys in the picture are tom turkeys. They must be collecting semen for artificial insemination.

The turkeys in the picture are tom turkeys. They must be collecting semen for artificial insemination.

IANAB, though I confess to some passing knowledge of where babies come from, and I saw a hell of a lot of eggs. The turkeys in this picture have red wattles, so I gather they are males. Now that I look more closely, I see that the turkey that was being inseminated (in another picture, which I will spare you) has no wattles and is presumably female. As I understood it, the function of the farm was to provide fertilized eggs for turkey farms.

Whew. For a minute there I was having flashbacks to the infamous Sarah turkey video.

Enjoy.

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Just like that? Not even dinner and a movie beforehand?

Considering how easy it is to get parthenogenically derived eggs from domestic turkeys I wonder “Why bother?”

The turkey is about to be inseminated (artificially, that is)

I can’t put into words how grateful I am for the clarification.

The broad-breasted white (BBW) (those shown) and the broad-breasted bronze (BBB) breeds of turkeys grow so quickly that they rapidly outgrow their ability to procreate naturally.

I butchered several six-month old BBW toms last weekend that topped 40 lbs.

I doubt that “parthenogenetically derived eggs” would be able to meet the demands of a commercial production operation. Turkeys also have that ability to store sperm for 4-6 weeks to fertilize the eggs they produce.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on November 26, 2009 8:00 AM.

Hunter vs. Hunt on Turf-13 was the previous entry in this blog.

The Fruitlessness of ID “Research” is the next entry in this blog.

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