Independence Day bouquet

| 7 Comments
IMG_4309_Ind_Day_600.jpg

Independence Day bouquet – Alpine thistle, daisy chrysanthemum, button chrysanthemum, spray rose. Flowers courtesy of Sturtz and Copeland Florists and Garden Center, Boulder, Colorado.

7 Comments

As any gardener would note the problem is always to get a true blue. Oddly enough this also holds in the animal world where blue, at least in birds, comes from refraction of the surface of the feathers. Anyone know why ‘blue’ is so difficult?

I’m not quite sure what the implications of us true blue Democrats might be.

… the problem is always to get a true blue.

That’s curious. Blue occupies a healthy portion of the visible spectrum, and many insects can see into the ultraviolet, so you would expect a healthy reflectance in the blue portion of the spectrum. Maybe it is mixed with red or violet.

At any rate, you can always do it this way.

… blue, at least in birds, comes from refraction of the surface of the feathers.

Mostly not refraction, I think, but interference from stratified feathers.

Happy birthday, neighbours. I hope I look as good when I’m 224.

Matt Young said:

Mostly not refraction, I think, but interference from stratified feathers.

Indeed with grackles, hummingbirds, and a number of other birds with rich, deep coloring, slight changes in the direction of bright sunlight makes the colors change.

Grackles look purple in some kinds of lighting and jet black in others. The ruby throated hummingbirds that come around our feeder change color even as they come in for a landing on the feeder. The flashing of their ruby bib appears to be a refractive effect.

The flashing of their ruby bib appears to be a refractive effect.

No, it is red because of interference colors – think of Bragg reflection or multilayer films.

When I was in college, I heard a colloquium by the physicist who was apparently the first one to explain why the hummingbird was colored even though there was no pigment. All I remember clearly was his closing line: “I myself heff never seen one, but I know exectly why zey are colored.” At least, I think that’s how he sounded.

I just wish my blueberry bushes would start producing tons of blueberries.

oops. 234. Heh.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on July 4, 2010 8:00 AM.

The God App was the previous entry in this blog.

Can radio waves harm trees? is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Categories

Archives

Author Archives

Powered by Movable Type 4.381

Site Meter