And the winners are…

| 4 Comments

with contributions by Matt Young

Due to some hanging chads, we have two winners this week for the “invasive” category—kinda makes sense—Al Denelsbeck and Malcolm S. Schongalla.

Balanus improvisus, bay barnacle by Al Denelsbeck — They are now showing up far removed from their originating Atlantic home. Here, I caught detail of the “toes” (cirri) during feeding, with a depth of field estimated at less than 2mm. And of course, Darwin spent no small amount of time working with barnacles and their taxonomy.

Apis mellifera, European honeybee, Christchurch Botanic Gardens, New Zealand by Malcolm S. Schongalla — This species was introduced to New Zealand in 1839. It has suffered from worldwide population declines and “colony collapse disorder.” This species holds the unlikely honor of being simultaneously invasive, valued, and in peril.

The Talk Origins Archive Foundation has generously offered to provide the winner with an autographed copy of Why Evolution Works (and Creationism Fails), by Matt Young and Paul Strode. (Update: we may have more options for the winner to choose from.)

(Winners, please send your mailing address to [Enable javascript to see this email address.].)

4 Comments

Dammit bees, make up your mind. I’ll either root “for” or “against” you, but this situation dependent grey area is just too much =)

Improvisus? Is there a story behind that?

What a fantastic photo. I could only dream of catching such a picture, underwater and with such fantastic depth-of-field staging. This picture belongs in a textbook, at least!

I really can’t remember which one I voted for, but in retrospect, I really love the barnacle photo. I remember when I was an undergrad taking a summer Marine Ecology course in Maine, looking down on some barnacles in shallow water, and watching them sweep through the water when it was still, or holding their legs’ filtering apparatus into the current whenever a wave swept by. Fascinating, as Mr. Spock would say.

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This page contains a single entry by Reed A. Cartwright published on August 30, 2010 11:54 AM.

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