Acer saccharum, A. freemanii

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MapleTrees.jpg

Acer saccharumsugar maple – and A. freemanii “Autumn Blaze”, Boulder, Colorado. Neither is native to this area. Autumn Blaze is a hybrid of silver maple and red maple.

12 Comments

Oh, how stunning. In central California, we don’t see much of those kinds of seasonal colors. Gorgeous.

They are so beautiful up in the tree. And they fall down and I break my back raking and bagging them. Ouch!

I wonder how these trees are able to make leaves year after year and I bag the leaves and the municipality hauls it away. Will the nutrients in the soil be depleted and at some point the trees will get stunted or something?

Also wondering why one should rake the leaves and bag them. What would happen if I can get some kind of machine to chop the leaves down and leave them in the lawn. Would they rot and become fertilizer?

Ravilyn Sanders said:

Also wondering why one should rake the leaves and bag them. What would happen if I can get some kind of machine to chop the leaves down and leave them in the lawn. Would they rot and become fertilizer?

I’ve been mulching my maple leaves with my lawn mower for a number of years and it seems to help the lawn. The lawn mower has a mulching blade and cover that blocks the ejection port of the mower. I mulch the leaves several times as they fall and when they are dry; and then they mulch almost into a powder.

I think whether or not it is good for the lawn depends on the type of tree leaves and on the pH of the soil. I am told that oak leaves are quite acidic and kill the lawn.

Mike Elzinga said: I’ve been mulching my maple leaves with my lawn mower for a number of years and it seems to help the lawn. The lawn mower has a mulching blade and cover that blocks the ejection port of the mower. I mulch the leaves several times as they fall and when they are dry; and then they mulch almost into a powder.

Some quick googling turns up: http://www.grounds-mag.com/mag/grou[…]tree_leaves/

I do have one oak tree in my yard, I will do more research about it.

Owning a home is such a pain.

They are much prettier in New England where I grew up! However, the real question is is how such things come to be in a random explosion. If somebody blew up some lumber and these trees appeared, it would be the first real evidence for evolutionism.

Thanks for the link Ravilyn. That article is great.

I’m in the landscape industry and I’m always interested in making things easier for my clients. I usually suggest they leave the leaves whenever they can. Using any mower will help chop up those leaves and blow them into the bed areas. Big leaves mat up and take a long time to decompose. Run over them a couple of times with the mower and you’ve got free mulch.

The article at Ravilyn’s link discusses using those leaves in the lawn–and Purdue’s science behind it. If a mulching mower really can break those leaves down well enough that they disappear into the lawn, then why should anyone throw away free compost. Lawn companies have a pelletized compost product they can spread on your lawn for about $300 for a 1/4 acre lawn. It can be a real pain to spread typical composted material on the lawn (spreaders won’t work unless the stuff is bone dry and chopped small). It won’t substitute for nitrogen fertilizing but it will make your soil happy. Happy soil makes for happy plants.*

Heck, try it and one day your treeless neighbors might be wishing they weren’t.

*I can’t help anthropormophizing plants a bit (soil too, I quess), I call plants “he” a lot and often talk to them when planting. It’s just a bit weird and not scientific at all.

Hygaboo Andersen said:

They are much prettier in New England where I grew up! However, the real question is is how such things come to be in a random explosion. If somebody blew up some lumber and these trees appeared, it would be the first real evidence for evolutionism.

Well, their presence in Boulder is due entirely to the efforts of the non-native human immigrants to the area.

Before those immigrants arrived with their favorite trees, the only trees around here (at Boulder’s elevation) were Cottonwoods in the Boulder Creek riparian zone.

As for your “exploding lumber” analogy attempt, well.…it make so little sense that it can be safely ignored by all.

If somebody blew up some lumber and these trees appeared, it would be the first real evidence for evolutionism.

sorry, you’ll have to share your drugs with us before we can even begin to understand what the hell you are saying here.

oh, that’s not entirely accurate, I’ve seen the crazy so often now I can probably guess that you’re yet another idjut, trying to rephrase the watchmaker argument.

here’s a hint:

Paley has been dead for over 200 years.

stop already.

bloody spammers are hitting a lot of sites HARD today.

Regarding these trees, I’ve never used Autumn Blaze in my projects because silver maple is not a desireable tree here. I wish we could grow Sugar Maples here, but they don’t like our heat. We readily grow cultivars of Acer rubrum and some are excellent. Acer barbatum or Florida maple is a possible substitute for us, but its color can’t quite compete with sugar maples. Just like Colorado, we have lots of northern transplants who want the same fall color here. We can do a lot, but not exactly what they want. But, heck, here we can have something blooming year round–can’t do that in NE.

This post spurred me to get my latest blog post up. I posted ‘Leave the Leaves’ last night. I use my posts to help my clients. As a reference they can check out for help.

I have way too much spam on my little blog. Maybe if I go ahead and update WordPress it’ll be better? I moderate almost everything. But most of my comments are spam anyway, so I don’t think it bothers anyone. It is really interesting to see some of the spammers’ comments. Some are just lists of drugs, others comments that first complement then try to put in a link. Have they gotten more sophisticated or am I just lucky to have missed them until now?

O Canada! Truly, (Broad-leafed maple A. macrophyllum is on my flag, but vine maples (Acer douglasii?) are my favorite (autumn) tree.

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on October 18, 2010 12:00 PM.

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