Kentucky Jumps the Ark

| 398 Comments

by Daniel Phelps

Answers in Genesis ministries has partnered with Ark Encounters, to build an 800 acre theme park in Grant County, Kentucky (a rural part of the north central Bluegrass). The theme park will feature a “full scale replica” of Noah’s Ark as well as other “attractions” as proposed here.

The project has received support from the highest levels of the Commonwealth of Kentucky’s government. On Wednesday, December 1, Governor Beshear held a press conference with officials from AIG and Ark Encounters to announce that the state is giving the creationists a tax incentive to bring jobs to the cash strapped region. Up to $37.5 million of the $150 million total cost could go to the creationists in the form of tax breaks under Kentucky’s Tourism Development Act. Apparently, the theme park can withhold 25% of the sales tax it collects up to 25% of the total cost for building the park under the Tourism Development Act.

398 Comments

From the link:

The Ark Encounter will include a full-scale Ark, built according to the biblical dimensions and constructed with materials and methods as close as possible to those of Noah’s time.

Really? They are going to have a single 600-year-old man build the Ark single handedly?

I would gladly pay any admission price to watch that.

Where are they going to get the gopherwood?

I wanna see them bring in every species of termite from all over the world; two by two by two by …

Tex said:

From the link:

The Ark Encounter will include a full-scale Ark, built according to the biblical dimensions and constructed with materials and methods as close as possible to those of Noah’s time.

Really? They are going to have a single 600-year-old man build the Ark single handedly?

I would gladly pay any admission price to watch that.

Also from the same link:

Elements of the Ark account are found in the history of many cultures throughout the world.

Now, that is factually accurate. The letter “A” (from “Ark”), for instance, recurs simply too many times in “Edda” and “Beowulf” for the fact to be dismissed as a coincidence.

Seems to me that if Answers in Genesis is soliciting money from the public or the public sector to build a “replica” of Noah’s Ark there is a case to take them to the courts for soliciting money under false pretences.

This is no “replica” by any definition of the term; it’s an attempt to build something out of a kiddies’ Sunday School colouring book representation.

Ian Plimer in Australia did something along these lines when the nutters tried to raise money from the public to fund an expedition to find Noah’s Ark.

I would love to see John Woodmorappe in court as an “expert witness” , complete with his Tourette’s Syndrome, defending his “skills” as a naval architect.

It would make the defendants at the Dover trial sound sane.

Terenzio the Troll claims “Now, that is factually accurate. The letter “A” (from “Ark”), for instance, recurs simply too many times in “Edda” and “Beowulf” for the fact to be dismissed as a coincidence.”

Where? Have you actually ever read Beowulf?

Roger Stanyard said:

Seems to me that if Answers in Genesis is soliciting money from the public or the public sector to build a “replica” of Noah’s Ark there is a case to take them to the courts for soliciting money under false pretences.

This is no “replica” by any definition of the term; it’s an attempt to build something out of a kiddies’ Sunday School colouring book representation.

Ian Plimer in Australia did something along these lines when the nutters tried to raise money from the public to fund an expedition to find Noah’s Ark.

I would love to see John Woodmorappe in court as an “expert witness” , complete with his Tourette’s Syndrome, defending his “skills” as a naval architect.

It would make the defendants at the Dover trial sound sane.

Since they say it will float, they should fill it with the equivalent weight of 2 adult pairs of every species plus enough fodder and bedding for the duration and then launch it. If they claim it really is a replica it should float even loaded, right?

Pitch! Don’t forget all that pitch!

Kentucky: Now 25% more stupid than Arkansas!

Roger Stanyard said:

Terenzio the Troll claims “Now, that is factually accurate. The letter “A” (from “Ark”), for instance, recurs simply too many times in “Edda” and “Beowulf” for the fact to be dismissed as a coincidence.”

Where? Have you actually ever read Beowulf?

Well, from the very incipit: “Hwæt! We Gardena”, already we have two “a”.

I could say more: we find works from classical antiquity that share a lot of “e”s with the Ark account in the Bible. For instance: “arma virumque cano troiae qui primus ab oris italiam fato profugus laviniaque venit”; and: “There went in two and two unto Noah into the ark, the male and the female, as God had commanded Noah.”

Of course, finding all the five vowels and many consonants in both the verse from the Bible and the one from Aeneid clearly shows that both tales share a common substrate.

If they are going to build a full size replica they can use half of it for research purposes. Stick a minimum of 15,000 animals the average size of a sheep in one half and all the food that you can cram in and see if 8 people can survive with the animals for a year. The number Woodmoraph came up with was 30,000 animals to account for all the kinds, and I figure make the full number of humans share the work load of caring for that zoo as long as Ham is one of the volunteers. They can even make it simple in the food and animal department by using 15,000 sheep so they only would need one type of feeding and watering system and food for only one species. They could glass off that half and visitors could observe their progress until the Human society shut the fiasco down. The project probably wouldn’t last more than the first 40 days because the Bible says that they shut the door and window (singular as for only one window in the whole ark, they had to keep out the raging flood)for the 40 days of the flood. That should pretty much end the experiment within a few days (likely within the first 24 hours of the window being shut. So the volunteers wouldn’t expect to have to be exhibits for a year or have to deal with tons of liquid waste and fecal matter.

Wolfhound said:

Kentucky: Now 25% more stupid than Arkansas!

In terms of public school education, you used to hear “Thank god for Mississippi and Louisiana.” because Arkansas was third from the bottom, but then we slipped a notch, but with Jindle as gov of Louisiana we shouldn’t have to worry about the current rankings getting worse.

Pitch! Don’t forget all that pitch!

And pooper-scoopers!

Ron Okimoto said:

If they are going to build a full size replica they can use half of it for research purposes. Stick a minimum of 15,000 animals the average size of a sheep in one half and all the food that you can cram in and see if 8 people can survive with the animals for a year.

I think you have the seeds of a reality show fit to rival Sarah Palin’s Alaska!

Any way you slice it, this is one of the best PT post titles ever. I want to know where the Babylonians are to protest the co-option of their flood story by those uppity Isrealites. Teach the Gilgamesh Controversy!

the state is giving the creationists a tax incentive to bring jobs to the cash strapped region.

Those jobs, at least the direct ones in the theme park, are almost certainly going to go only to fundie xians.

Ham is a typical fundie hater and makes everyone sign some hardcore fundie Statement of Faith to work in his museum. It excludes Mainline Protestants, Catholics, and everyone else. Since the fake museum is a religious cult nonprofit, it is legal to discriminate on religious grounds and they do it.

I’m sure the Arkland theme park will be the same.

Not seeing how it is legal for the state to subsidize a cult religious theme park. This isn’t much different from a church and AFAIK, the state doesn’t pay for churches either.

Well this is obviously a clear violation of the establishment clause. I’m sure the lawsuits will be starting any time now. If not, then I’m sure that every religion in the country will be applying for tax credits to build their favorite myth museum. Now let’s see, how about tax credits to build a giant globe balanced on the back of a turtle. In fact, how about a stack of turtles - all the way down. That should stimulate the economy.

Naw, sticking all those animals (say the entire community of animals in th Louisville KY zoo) would be totally inhumane and cruel to the animals.

I suggest we get an equivalent number of fundies and stuff them in the ark. I’ll even give them the benefit of the doubt and allow them all the MREs they can fit in there. Then we seal it up for a year or two and see what happens.

Note, that WE all know exactly what will happen and so do they which means they don’t really believe their bible any more than an atheist does. I think every commentary and discussion of this theme park should include the question, would you be willing to lock yourself in this structure with 7 other humans for a year? If not, why?

DS said:

Well this is obviously a clear violation of the establishment clause. I’m sure the lawsuits will be starting any time now. If not, then I’m sure that every religion in the country will be applying for tax credits to build their favorite myth museum. Now let’s see, how about tax credits to build a giant globe balanced on the back of a turtle. In fact, how about a stack of turtles - all the way down. That should stimulate the economy.

What’s going to be even more interesting in when a muslim community tries to get the same tax credit for their theme park. I’d pay money to sit in that executive session.

Ron Okimoto said:

The number Woodmoraph came up with was 30,000 animals to account for all the kinds, and I figure make the full number of humans share the work load of caring for that zoo as long as Ham is one of the volunteers.

That would be the only way to make it accurate.. It says so right here.

 Genesis 5:32 After Noah was 500 years old, he became the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.

He’s right there in the story so he would have to be a volunteer to make it accurate.

Mike in Ontario, NY said:

Any way you slice it, this is one of the best PT post titles ever. I want to know where the Babylonians are to protest the co-option of their flood story by those uppity Isrealites. Teach the Gilgamesh Controversy!

Ur!!!

They hadn’t got to Israel then . Anyway much of Israel is post Tertiary and the KT boundary marks the end of the flud

I’m torn, on one hand I am apposed to the government assisting AiG w/ anything in any form

on the gripping hand - the tax incentives are against future sales tax - so this park is a for profit enterprise - and the potential for Schadenfreude is immense - AiG will be spending something like $150M on this - WHEN it fails that will have been money they didn’t spend on other potentially more dangerous endeavors.

Wolfhound said:

Kentucky: Now 25% more stupid than Arkansas!

They certainly have us on this one. OUR creation museum in Eureka Springs is pathetic by comparison the the AiG effort. If we were to build an Ark exhibit, it probably would be an over-sized plastic model in a kiddy pool outside a meth-lab trailer behind the Walmart in Harrison.

Copy-pasted from pharyngula:

Bein’ as it its in Kentuck’, I kin say there’ll be one of them tornaders along directly to chew that puppy up and spit her out. That’ll learn the old boys a thang or three.

I’d like to see a replica of the flood, not just the ark…especially if it were only a local flood :)

Seriously, though, I’ve always wondered why ICR types haven’t done more in vitro flood research, e.g., putting a bunch of bones and dirt in a big whirlpool and seeing how things sort out and how long it takes for fossils to form.

Who gets to play Uti-Napishtim?

jkc said: Seriously, though, I’ve always wondered why ICR types haven’t done more in vitro flood research, e.g., putting a bunch of bones and dirt in a big whirlpool and seeing how things sort out and how long it takes for fossils to form.

You can’t seriously wonder. The reason they don’t is because they know such experiments would not yield the results they want.

I think there is a small camp that admits reality won’t function the way they claim. They claim this is because a miracle/different physics occurred in the past. But since that explanation clearly and transparently puts the flood theory outside the boundaries of science, this admission doesn’t help get Jesus into science classes, which is the point of the exercise. So I don’t think that’s a big camp. Most YECers would rather just ignore the whole idea of testing.

If this is going to be an exact replica, shouldn’t it also smell like the original? I wonder how many tourists would then want to go through it.

And what about the hermaphrodites? Will there be two, or one of each?

[Bankrupt European looks at USA, smiles smugly]

Old Hambo is deluded enough that he can say anything that flits into his snake’s-nest brain with absolute conviction, even if it’s the opposite of what he just said.

We all know, even Hambo, that he will be unable to build a “wooden ark using materials and methods” etc, etc. He’s already got an engineering firm on the job, so we all know that the replica ark will have to be built to code, and not the Bible Code.

Steel supports, lighting, ADA compliant, fire retardant material and all that stuff.

For amusement, though, it would be nice to hear from some real structural engineers about building a craft of the dimensions stated and what the challenges would be. How would it hold together on land, much less bobbing in the sea?

On the bright side (think dim bulb bright) Hambo has already raised $115,000 in two days according to the Ark Encounter website.

Great minds think alike.

Ichthyic said: I get over 600,000 hits on search for ebola and cookies.

must mean there is a vast cookie consipracy!

what a complete maroon.

In this context, shouldn’t that be…

What a complete macaroon.

–W. H. Heydt

Old Used programmer

John Vanko said:

I think faith4flipper and Kris have a similar agenda. Robin notes Bobby.

I dropped out for a while – sometimes the noise level gets to me – but I recall from early postings of “faith4flipper” is that he was just plain weird.

That is, not the normal weird associated with run of the mill trolls.

Kris Wrote:

I march to my own drummer.

We have ourselves a real maverick here, you betcha! [wink]

John Vanko said:

He reminds me ever so much of IBIG who, after filling 400 panels in the Bathroom, went silent.

It appears that ALL of the aggressive trolls that show up here are extreme narcissists. And they all probably have some obsessive/compulsive notion that they want to set the record for running up the page count.

Since that seems to be characteristic of these trolls, what greater pain could anyone here inflict on them than to ignore them?

Trouble is that that’s like trying to ignore a persistent itch…

Yeah. How many times have people said: “Ignore the troll!” – ? One can make a personal choice on that of course, but there are people here (naming no names) who feel they have a DUTY to argue with trolls. I find that hard to understand, because the POINT of being a troll is to pick fights.

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