Kelvin-Helmholtz wave in clouds

| 7 Comments

Photograph by Deanna Young

PC020254_Clouds.jpg

Unusual cloud formation showing Kelvin-Helmholtz waves, Boulder, Colorado, 2010. Thanks to Kelly Chipps for providing the link.

7 Comments

Hmm, so what does the explanatory filter have to say about that?

I must admit that one of the nice things about living in the Front Range is the interesting diversity of cloud structures created by the Rockies. I like the “stack of plates” clouds in particular. Pilot acquaitances say they give them a wide berth.

very cool.

mrg said:

Hmm, so what does the explanatory filter have to say about that?

Probably something about pathetic levels of detail.

Is the EF incapable of producing false positives because it is positively false?

PS Nice picture

“On purely evolutionary grounds, however, one would have to say something like the following: clouds are the result of a Darwinian evolutionary climatic process that programmed the clouds with, presumably, a climatic algorithm that enables them, when put in the sky, to trace out forms that resolve the Kelvin-Helmholtz wave problem.”

There - saved Dembski from having to fill in the blanks, or even from having to respond…

mrg said:

Hmm, so what does the explanatory filter have to say about that?

I must admit that one of the nice things about living in the Front Range is the interesting diversity of cloud structures created by the Rockies. I like the “stack of plates” clouds in particular. Pilot acquaitances say they give them a wide berth.

The explanatory filter has zip to say about dissipative structures. Why, the information in shear instabilities of this sort must come from somewhere… Which is but one reason among many why it is worthless.

Strange attractors and an EF don’t mix.

mrg said:

I must admit that one of the nice things about living in the Front Range is the interesting diversity of cloud structures created by the Rockies. I like the “stack of plates” clouds in particular. Pilot acquaitances say they give them a wide berth.

Once upon a time I decided to learn how to fly sailplanes in the (now) apparent tranquility of the Arizona desert.

Now I look up at sailplanes being towed under the most amazing cloud terranes at the base of Boulder Canyon and think…what the heck are they doing…and then.…hmmmm.…maybe I need to go for a ride.

Stuart Weinstein said:

mrg said:

Hmm, so what does the explanatory filter have to say about that?

I must admit that one of the nice things about living in the Front Range is the interesting diversity of cloud structures created by the Rockies. I like the “stack of plates” clouds in particular. Pilot acquaitances say they give them a wide berth.

The explanatory filter has zip to say about dissipative structures. Why, the information in shear instabilities of this sort must come from somewhere… Which is but one reason among many why it is worthless.

Strange attractors and an EF don’t mix.

Haha, I was kinda lost back there by your statement. But are we sure though if this is not photoshop edited?

Eric

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on February 21, 2011 12:00 PM.

Dembski Wakes Up, Smells the Steiners, Pushes Snooze Button was the previous entry in this blog.

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