Branta canadensis

| 19 Comments

Photograph by Louis Shackleton.

Shackleton.Branta_canadensis.jpg

Branta canadensis – Canada goose, Greenfield Lake, downtown Wilmington, North Carolina. The goose in the background is probably a hybrid between B. canadensis and a domestic goose. You may see more of Mr. Shackleton’s photographs here.

19 Comments

But are you sure this isn’t a wild goose chase?

It seems we’ve been goosed.

Lou always takes such nice photos. :)

That appears to be a variety of Cypress tree in the background.

Bald Cypress perhaps?

Mike Elzinga said:

That appears to be a variety of Cypress tree in the background.

Bald Cypress perhaps?

I thought they prefer to be called “Follicularly-Challenged Conifers”

apokryltaros said:

Mike Elzinga said:

That appears to be a variety of Cypress tree in the background.

Bald Cypress perhaps?

I thought they prefer to be called “Follicularly-Challenged Conifers”

:-)

It is interesting to speculate what kinds of “anti-sexual orientation” and “defense of marriage” politics there would be if plants had become the life forms to develop intelligence and political ideologies.

I wish Canada Geese had been left in America. They are becoming a real problem in England. I was visiting a nature reserve in Buckinghamshire yesterday (College lake) and there must have been 50-100 of the wretched things - outnumbering all the UK native water birds put together.

https://www.google.com/accounts/o8/[…]XGhVKgIehe38 said:

…there must have been 50-100 of the wretched things - outnumbering all the UK native water birds put together.

Like McDonalds, eh?

https://www.google.com/accounts/o8 … said: I wish Canada Geese had been left in America.

Hang on! D’ye think Canucks are gonna be happy at you calling them AMERICANS?! I think not!

Incidentally, on this subject I have a vague memory of a FAR SIDE cartoon about geese walking into a tunnel: “HONK!HONK! HONK!HONK!HONK!” One of those gags on the thin edge of funny, or not.

(safire) The English use the word “America” in its proper, continental sense. The country to my immediate south is The United States, not “America”. (/safire)

fnxtr said:

(safire) The English use the word “America” in its proper, continental sense. The country to my immediate south is The United States, not “America”. (/safire)

And, technically, the country to the immediate south of the country to your immediate south is also known as “United States”.

fnxtr said: The English use the word “America” in its proper, continental sense.

Yes, but I’m a Yank and I know better than to even hint that a Scotsman is an Englishman. There are parts of Canada where a comparable rule applies.

mrg said:

Yes, but I’m a Yank…

I loved watching a friend from South Carolina being called a “Yank” in Australia. Better to barrack for the wrong footie club in the wrong pub.

… but since there’s no continent called “Mexico”, that name can be used for the country.

https://www.google.com/accounts/o8/[…]XGhVKgIehe38 said:

I wish Canada Geese had been left in America. They are becoming a real problem in England. I was visiting a nature reserve in Buckinghamshire yesterday (College lake) and there must have been 50-100 of the wretched things - outnumbering all the UK native water birds put together.

Well, let’s go to the source, then.

When you say “America”, do you mean The United States of same, or the continent? Or you do not distinguish between the northernmost two countries of said continent?

Heh. While we’re at it, the names of the four continents are

AfroEurasia

America

Australia

Antarctica.

Shebardigan said:

Heh. While we’re at it, the names of the four continents are

AfroEurasia

America

Australia

Antarctica.

No. Three continents. Oceania, Eurasia, Eastasia.

Shebardigan said: I loved watching a friend from South Carolina being called a “Yank” in Australia.

“I AIN’T NO DAMN YANKEE!” To the theme of “Dixie” being played on his cellphone ringtone.

Wow, I’m tickled to be featured here at The Thumb of course, but pleasantly surprised at the response. Thank you, Matt, and everyone who’s commented.

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on July 18, 2011 12:00 PM.

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