Phalacrocorax carbo

| 10 Comments

Photograph by Marilyn Susek.

Photography contest, Honorable Mention

Susek_ScarboroCliffs_Cormorant.jpg

Phalacrocorax carbo – cormorant, dolomite stone quarry at Stainton, near Tickhill, S. Yorkshire, UK.

10 Comments

Correction, Matt: It’s Phalacrocorax - Family is Phalacrocoracidae.

We have Brandt’s Cormorants and Double-Crested Cormorants where I live in California. It’s interesting to see a flock of them herding fish in a shallow lake next to my office in San Jose, and roosting overnight in the Sycamore trees around the lake.

So, are they employed at that quarry, or are they trespassing? ;)

Henry J said:

So, are they employed at that quarry, or are they trespassing? ;)

They’re either looking for paper bags or guarding them against the bears with buns.…

Incidentally, does “Phalacrocorax” have any connection with “Crocoduck”?

This brings back memories of a lovely sunny day in July this year. The pair were visiting, just bellow the cliff, from memory about 30 feet there is a lagoon, they stop about 3 or 4 days then go to their next feeding post it seems they have been more frequent this year than most, the scene is quite prehistoric it’s really lovely, I thought I’d found a link to the Dodo.

Kevin B said: …Does “Phalacrocorax” have any connection with “Crocoduck”?

No - “the scientific genus name is latinized Ancient Greek, from φαλακρός (phalakros, “bald”) and κόραξ (korax, “raven”).” - Wikipedia

I’m sorry, I cannot resist.

They stand out like a couple of shags on a rock.

From the fact that no one else has noticed this, I can only assume this expression is uniquely Australian.

wolstenholme said:

I’m sorry, I cannot resist.

They stand out like a couple of shags on a rock.

From the fact that no one else has noticed this, I can only assume this expression is uniquely Australian.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cormorant says both “cormorant” and “shag” come from Great Britain.

Paul Burnett said:

wolstenholme said:

I’m sorry, I cannot resist.

They stand out like a couple of shags on a rock.

From the fact that no one else has noticed this, I can only assume this expression is uniquely Australian.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cormorant says both “cormorant” and “shag” come from Great Britain.

Trust me, we’ve got lots of creatures in Australia with the same name as something in Britain! Aussie shags and cormorants are amongst the few that are actually related to their namesakes.

There is a subspecies found in Australasian waters, the Phalacrocorax carbo novaehollandiae.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalacrocorax_carbo

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on November 21, 2011 12:00 PM.

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