Ark Park Still in Kentucky Budget

| 158 Comments

The governor of Kentucky plans budget cuts of $350 million over two years, including $50 million from public education and substantial cuts to higher education – but has managed to find $11 million to build an interchange to a phantasmical Ark Park, according to LEO Weekly, a Louisville alternative newspaper. Presumably the interchange, which will connect to a 1-mile road between Interstate 75 and a town of 3500, will go to roughly the same place as the Bridge to Nowhere or one of its brethren.

The governor, Steve Beshear, reportedly understands that his state “struggles due to the lack of an educated labor force” and admits that his proposed budget “is inadequate for the future needs of our people.” Maybe he should read a recent editorial in Science magazine and ponder whether the poor performance of US students in science and mathematics can be traced to politicians who cut education budgets and pander to anti-scientific crackpots.

158 Comments

Not a lot of mystery here, of course. The uneducated may not contribute much and the state may struggle as a result, but who among us would deny any citizen the right to vote just because they belong to an uneducated labor force? And what governor has ever been elected, who displeases his voters? If Beshear eliminated this interchange from the budget, would a more conservative opponent do more for education?

If the Ark Park is ever built (and it looks unlikely right now), he can hope Kentucky’s take from that park will exceed the discounted cost of the interchange over its lifespan. And the more cuts to education, the more probable that becomes. Meanwhile, I know of a great place to locate a new Cracker Barrel.

Indeed, but did you have a specific one in mind?

Just Bob said:

Indeed, but did you have a specific one in mind?

This one stood out.

Laws are no longer made by a rational process of public discussion; they are made by a process of blackmail and intimidation, and they are executed in the same manner.

The Discovery Institute has been absolutely indispensable to the success of the ID movement. Without it, most of us would have ended up as road kill.

Bill Dembski in a recent interview

Got to have roads to the stupid park in order to keep the stupid from becoming road kill (might be able to mow down an atheist or two on the interchange, too).

I guess Billy realizes that IDiots are too stupid to avoid big scary things made with science. And Lord knows they’re not ever going to come up with anything worth knowing.

So they need Dominionists and pandering governors to, you know, prevent natural selection from happening–long a goal of theirs.

Glen Davidson

Without regard to the ridiculous ark park, the interchange provides (ironically) low education jobs at the expense of education. These jobs are short term, and their impact on the economy is transient. Investing in education is a long term commitment to build a more highly educated workforce and boost the future of the state’s economy.

The ark park itself doubles down on the education front, providing low wage, low education jobs as well and creating an atmosphere conducive to pseudo-science and alienating any high tech / science firms that might want to locate there. Who wants to build in a state where education is not a priority and where government panders to morons.

Indiana is not far behind in this battle of whose state can be the most ignorant:

http://www.au.org/blogs/wall-of-sep[…]ces-in-state

A pen pal has just informed me that The State of State Science Standards awarded Kentucky a grade of D for 2012. Kentucky did not do so hot in 2005 either: D. Indiana, incidentally, was awarded an A in 2005 and an A– in 2012, despite the disquieting information in Mr. K’s link.

(1) The interchange will provide many jobs, and like most states, Kentucky needs more jobs.

(2) The interchange will make travel easier on tourists, and like most states, Kentucky needs more tourism dollars.

(3) The Ark Park (see the project at ArkEncounter.com), will provide large amounts of said tourism dollars, which will help Kentucky’s economy (and most states need the same help).

(4) The Ark Park will be an effective means of helping large numbers of people from many states, both old and young, to seriously think about major spiritual issues affecting their own lives, leading to positive changes and personal transformation.

(5) Therefore the Ark Park is clearlly a win-win situation for everybody. Gov. Brashear is doing the right thing for his state. Nothing to complain about.

****

Meanwhile, the Ark Park can be a source of fruitful, interesting rational thought (for those who like to think), even right now.

For example, here’s a simple but not-so-simple Ark Park question. Try it out:

Which is ultimately better: To spend X amount of money to build the Ark Park which explores the themes of Noah’s Ark, the Flood, and personal salvation, or to spend the same X amount of money on the poor?

See what you come up with. To help out, here’s a small article from AIG which explores and explains the issue:

http://www.answersingenesis.org/art[…]build-an-ark

FL

Here’s a better answer, sillypants: Spend same X amount of money on real education. Weird, I know.

Pretty lame taunting, even for you, FL.

FL said: The Ark Park will be an effective means of helping large numbers of people from many states, both old and young, to seriously think about major spiritual issues affecting their own lives, leading to positive changes and personal transformation.

Why should the taxpayers of the state - or any state - support such a blatantly sectarian project? Or have you never heard of separation of church and state?

FL said:

(5) Therefore the Ark Park is clearlly a win-win situation for everybody. Gov. Brashear is doing the right thing for his state. Nothing to complain about.

Except for Kentucky’s children, who will have 50 million dollars cut from their education.

Which is ultimately better: To spend X amount of money to build the Ark Park which explores the themes of Noah’s Ark, the Flood, and personal salvation, or to spend the same X amount of money on the poor?

How exactly does building an amusement park glorifying genocide and stupidity help feed and cloth and put a roof over the heads of the poor? By putting those that pass Ham’s religious litmus tests to work as minimum-wage day-laborers building and staffing it?

Wolfhound said:

Here’s a better answer, sillypants: Spend same X amount of money on real education. Weird, I know.

Pretty lame taunting, even for you, FL.

What did you expect from someone who lacks the backbone to tell us what “created kind” a penguin is?

FL said:

(1) The interchange will provide many jobs, and like most states, Kentucky needs more jobs.

Short-term construction jobs. Which Kentucky could also create through doing transportation infrastructure improvements throughout the state, or to some more proven tourist attraction like Churchill Downs. The jobs this highway construction provides may be better in comparison to doing nothing, but a more rational question to ask is how it stacks up against other uses of the same money. I.e., ask what it’s opportunity cost is. On that analysis, it sucks.

Your points 2 and 3 assume the ark park will be successful. This seems recklessly, stupidly optimistic considering that their schedule called for them to have raised the money and broken ground by now, and in actuality they’ve only raised 25% of what they need. It seems that when Christian investors are asked to put their money where their mouth is, their confidence in the Ark Park’s success suddenly disappears.

(4) The Ark Park will be an effective means of helping large numbers of people from many states, both old and young, to seriously think about major spiritual issues affecting their own lives, leading to positive changes and personal transformation.

I think I’d prefer Churchill Downs on this metric too.

FL said:

(1) The interchange will provide many jobs, and like most states, Kentucky needs more jobs.

Those jobs would be better directed towards repairing the bridges that connect KY with IN.

(2) The interchange will make travel easier on tourists, and like most states, Kentucky needs more tourism dollars.

There is no tourist destination at the interchange in question.

(3) The Ark Park (see the project at ArkEncounter.com), will provide large amounts of said tourism dollars, which will help Kentucky’s economy (and most states need the same help).

The Ark Park won’t be built. It’s a cash cow for its originators, who will take the insufficient funds raised for the project and pocket them.

(4) The Ark Park will be an effective means of helping large numbers of people from many states, both old and young, to seriously think about major spiritual issues affecting their own lives, leading to positive changes and personal transformation.

Young out-of-staters will fairly scream at their parents “King’s Island is just up the road! Please don’t stop in KY.”

KY residents will visit once, say “meh”, and forget about it.

(5) Therefore the Ark Park is clearlly a win-win situation for everybody. Gov. Brashear is doing the right thing for his state. Nothing to complain about.

Beshear is pandering. Local interests will get the road money, yielding Beshear a bit of added influence (it’s called buying votes, and a time-honored tradition in local politics everywhere). Ham et al. will fleece would-be investors, pocketing the insufficient funds and shrugging.

FL said:

(4) The Ark Park will be an effective means of helping large numbers of people from many states, both old and young, to seriously think about major spiritual issues affecting their own lives, leading to positive changes and personal transformation.

FL

If that is a principal ambition for the project, with the right marketing Kentucky could have Fundamentalist Islamic States queuing up to fund a Qur’anic themed park.

QUESTION:

I would really appreciate an answer from anyone who is familiar with local Kentucky politics, e.g. a local resident.

I grew up in a rural area, albeit in Canada (I’m a dual citizen) not a southern one. At some point, people where I grew up, even the right wingers (and there are plenty), would begin to get very annoyed at something like this. I’m personally in favor of using infrastructure improvement to create temporary jobs during a recession - that part is a good idea. But building roads to nowhere (instead of improving roads that already exist or building roads that are needed) would irritate people where I grew up. So would government favoritism for some private boondoggle that never gets built. Cuts to local schools are always unpopular with everybody. This is the type of thing that would tend to cause a politician to lose office.

Is it different in Kentucky? Is all of this considered beyond criticism, simply because the magic words “Noah’s Ark” are involved?

apokryltaros said:

Which is ultimately better: To spend X amount of money to build the Ark Park which explores the themes of Noah’s Ark, the Flood, and personal salvation, or to spend the same X amount of money on the poor?

How exactly does building an amusement park glorifying genocide and stupidity help feed and cloth and put a roof over the heads of the poor? By putting those that pass Ham’s religious litmus tests to work as minimum-wage day-laborers building and staffing it?

Hey, be fair! There’s almost no place in KY someone can go to explore the theme of personal salvation; it’s not like there are any large organizations dedicated to such matters or any places one can go in most communities in the USA to meet with people affiliated with those organizations and discuss such matters.

FL said:

Which is ultimately better: To spend X amount of money to build the Ark Park which explores the themes of Noah’s Ark, the Flood, and personal salvation, or to spend the same X amount of money on the poor?

FL

Which is ultimately better: To spend X amount of money to build a voodoo park in Louisiana exploring the themes of witchcraft, reincarnation and voodoo dolls, or spend the same amount of money on education?

Which is ultimately better: To spend X amount of money to build a faith healing theme park exploring the themes of laying on of hands, praying for miracles and revival tent faith healings, or spend the same amount of money on hospitals and public health programs?

See, pandering to the lowest common denominator will get you nowhere in the long run. Reality will inevitably exact a toll, regardless of your denial. Preying on the weaknesses of the ignorant is hardly good public policy, besides being blatantly unconstitutional.

FL said:

(1) The interchange will provide many jobs, and like most states, Kentucky needs more jobs.

(2) The interchange will make travel easier on tourists, and like most states, Kentucky needs more tourism dollars.

(3) The Ark Park (see the project at ArkEncounter.com), will provide large amounts of said tourism dollars, which will help Kentucky’s economy (and most states need the same help).

(4) The Ark Park will be an effective means of helping large numbers of people from many states, both old and young, to seriously think about major spiritual issues affecting their own lives, leading to positive changes and personal transformation.

(5) Therefore the Ark Park is clearlly a win-win situation for everybody. Gov. Brashear is doing the right thing for his state. Nothing to complain about.

****

Meanwhile, the Ark Park can be a source of fruitful, interesting rational thought (for those who like to think), even right now.

For example, here’s a simple but not-so-simple Ark Park question. Try it out:

Which is ultimately better: To spend X amount of money to build the Ark Park which explores the themes of Noah’s Ark, the Flood, and personal salvation, or to spend the same X amount of money on the poor?

See what you come up with. To help out, here’s a small article from AIG which explores and explains the issue:

http://www.answersingenesis.org/art[…]build-an-ark

FL

And don’t forget how much PR value there is in cementing Kentucky’s reputation as a bunch of superstitious goobers.

We know that FL wants nothing more than that for himself, why not an entire state advertising ignorance and violence against anyone not properly “righteous.”

Glen Davidson

Is it different in Kentucky? Is all of this considered beyond criticism, simply because the magic words “Noah’s Ark” are involved?

The brief answer is yes. The argument always runs, if the ark park brings one person to Jesus and saves his soul, no amount of money is too great to achieve this. Conversely, not building the interchange is ANTI-GOD, and Kentucky will be punished.

No expenditure, policy or program is so stupid or wasteful that a majority won’t support it if it can be connected with Jesus and the Bible. Clearly, slashing education while subsidizing error and ignorance is being done to attract votes. And that’s because it DOES attract votes. Praise Jesus!

FL said:

Meanwhile, the Ark Park can be a source of fruitful, interesting rational thought (for those who like to think), even right now.

Cool. You mean like this:

Let’s play Creationist.

Now let’s assume that all of humanity, and all of mammal-kind, reptile-kind, bird-kind, amphibian-kind, etc., were sequestered on a Really Big Boat while all of their relations were drowned.

After this terrible event the survivors got off the Really Big Boat onto dry land and went forth and multiplied, repopulating Planet Earth.

Now here’s a question that needs answering - Since Creationists (and I mean Young-Earth Creationists) insist that ALL mutations are detrimental or else they REMOVE information from the genome, then how is it that immediately after the Really Big Flood there was hyper-accelerated mutation, all of them of a beneficial nature and making all the divers species from each of their kinds on the Big Boat?

How is it that so few human beings produced such an immense genetic diversity in such a short time? (Hint - they didn’t have the requisite diversity in their genes - hyper-accelerated mutation is required.) We know the average rate of mutations, of various kinds, today. Some are beneficial, some are neutral, some are detrimental, and we haven’t had enough time to classify each and every one. But nothing has ever been observed like the hyper-evolution required to repopulate the Planet after the Really Big Flood.

It ain’t possible. Unless you want to evoke divine hyper-evolution for a very short time, then ABSOLUTELY no evolution thereafter.

Doesn’t that seem like ‘special pleading’? Miracles piled upon miracles ad infinitum. Why didn’t the Really Big Someone in the Sky just kill all the bad people with one fell swoop? Why go to all this trouble?

It doesn’t make sense. It don’t hold water. It’s a dog that won’t hunt. Simply put, it’s wrong.

So a really big world-wide flood can’t be part of ‘creation science’. Not unless you ignore reality.

Ain’t playin’ creationist fun?

Any rational mind would conclude that there cannot have been a world-wide flood and a Really, Really, Big Boat.

Thanks FL.

FL said:

(1) The interchange will provide many jobs, and like most states, Kentucky needs more jobs.

These are government paid jobs. In other words, Socialism.

In a true capitalistic economy, the Ark Park, a private for profit enterprise, would pay for their own interchange.

FL said:

Meanwhile, the Ark Park can be a source of fruitful, interesting rational thought (for those who like to think), even right now.

FL

Interesting that you should bring this up.

Some of us have actually engaged in the rational thought and have done the calculations on that purported Noachian flood and wooden boat story.

And just as you have never done such calculations with your faking it about entropy and thermodynamics, you also have never done the calculations about the flood and the wooden boat.

The result of those calculations demonstrates that the story is a myth.

You have been caught faking it again, FL. You never learn.

If the Ark Park is to have various “lands”, like Disneyland does (Frontierland, Tomorrowland, etc.), then I think it needs a “Live like Noah Land”, where creationists would get to experience, in a small way, daily life in Noah’s time.

As they enter, they would be stripped of ALL modern amenities: cell phones, iPods, eyeglasses, cameras, hearing aids, dentures, hairpieces, etc. Ideally, they should be literally stripped, and issued some sort of coarse, homespun woolen tunics or something, that are NEVER WASHED with soap or detergent. In this biblically-inspired venue, there could be no electricity whatever. No lighting, AC, fans, sound system, lighting, or anything. Plumbing? What plumbing? A slit trench to be squatted over. Toilet paper? Don’t make me laugh! Food service: untreated water dipped straight from the “crick” (downstream from the slit trench); fresh, hot goat, killed on the spot, carcasses hung in the open air (Would you like flies with that?); maybe some warm beer, brewed from an ancient Sumerian recipe; milk, fresh and warm from the goat; Sumerian-style bread, with plenty of milling grit, rodent feces, insect parts, etc. After lunch, let the faithful work for a couple of hours outdoors, shaping a beam or plank for the Ark, using only period-appropriate tools, and none of that socialist, government-mandated safety crap, like hardhats, gloves, steel-toed boots, kneepads, back braces, etc.

A semi-authentic “Ark experience” like that might give them a whole new perspective on Noah’s life and times. And maybe some of the kiddies would be disabused of their notions of cute storybook Arks with all the fun animals.

Just Bob said:

A semi-authentic “Ark experience” like that might give them a whole new perspective on Noah’s life and times. And maybe some of the kiddies would be disabused of their notions of cute storybook Arks with all the fun animals.

In fact, why not the full experience? How about something like up to 120 days completely enclosed in the ark with thousands of animals and all that manure, urine, vomit, and methane?

Oh; and those dinosaurs, gotta have those dinosaurs. A couple of T. Rexes is a must.

To make it more realistic, place the ark on a huge hydraulically driven platform and toss it, heave it, and roll it around for over 40 days with all those animals in there.

No doors, no ventilation, no place to eject the manure, urine, vomit, and everything else you want to get rid of in the most violent storm imaginable.

And, by the way, the violence of that storm and water is more than thousands of nuclear bombs going off in every square mile of the Earth’s surface for that entire period.

What fun!

Just Bob said: … Food service: untreated water dipped straight from the “crick” (downstream from the slit trench); fresh, hot goat, killed on the spot, carcasses hung in the open air (Would you like flies with that?); maybe some warm beer, brewed from an ancient Sumerian recipe; milk, fresh and warm from the goat; Sumerian-style bread, with plenty of milling grit, rodent feces, insect parts, etc. …

In other words, a much better balanced diet that the average teenager gets. ;)

As they enter, they would be stripped of ALL modern amenities: cell phones, iPods, eyeglasses, cameras, hearing aids, dentures, hairpieces, etc. Ideally, they should be literally stripped, and issued some sort of coarse, homespun woolen tunics or something, that are NEVER WASHED with soap or detergent. In this biblically-inspired venue, there could be no electricity whatever. No lighting, AC, fans, sound system, lighting, or anything. Plumbing? What plumbing? A slit trench to be squatted over. Toilet paper? Don’t make me laugh! Food service: untreated water dipped straight from the “crick” (downstream from the slit trench); fresh, hot goat, killed on the spot, carcasses hung in the open air (Would you like flies with that?); maybe some warm beer, brewed from an ancient Sumerian recipe; milk, fresh and warm from the goat; Sumerian-style bread, with plenty of milling grit, rodent feces, insect parts, etc. After lunch, let the faithful work for a couple of hours outdoors, shaping a beam or plank for the Ark, using only period-appropriate tools, and none of that socialist, government-mandated safety crap, like hardhats, gloves, steel-toed boots, kneepads, back braces, etc.

In general I think this regimen would be extremely good for all Americans who claim to have disdain for education, progress, and a cooperative society with regulations for the common good.

Except that I don’t think that they should be allowed beer.

Flint said:

Is it different in Kentucky? Is all of this considered beyond criticism, simply because the magic words “Noah’s Ark” are involved?

The brief answer is yes. The argument always runs, if the ark park brings one person to Jesus and saves his soul, no amount of money is too great to achieve this. Conversely, not building the interchange is ANTI-GOD, and Kentucky will be punished.

No expenditure, policy or program is so stupid or wasteful that a majority won’t support it if it can be connected with Jesus and the Bible. Clearly, slashing education while subsidizing error and ignorance is being done to attract votes. And that’s because it DOES attract votes. Praise Jesus!

Let me rephrase my question -

I understand that this is the mentality of some people everywhere, but why, in Kentucky, is it not opposed by more people?

For example, I lived in New Mexico for a couple of years. That’s a small population state that, while admittedly ethnically more diverse, is just as poor and full of social pathology as Kentucky. In fact they do worse than Kentucky on a number of quality of life indicators. (If anyone’s stereotypes are challenged by this, please note that only a small fraction of the state lives in the rich mountainous Santa Fe/Los Alamos/Taos area in the north - the rest of the state is poor, and Albuquerque is the cultural capital of the rest of the state.) New Mexico is also more Catholic than most states, but Kentucky has plenty of Catholics. There is absolutely no shortage of creationists in NM.

But I’m positive that a policy that combined cuts to local schools, worthless road projects, and public funding of a boondoggle, even if an ostensibly “religious” boondoggle, would generate a lot of public irritation, even in some of the more impoverished, conservative, rural parts of New Mexico.

harold said:

Flint said:

Is it different in Kentucky? Is all of this considered beyond criticism, simply because the magic words “Noah’s Ark” are involved?

The brief answer is yes. The argument always runs, if the ark park brings one person to Jesus and saves his soul, no amount of money is too great to achieve this. Conversely, not building the interchange is ANTI-GOD, and Kentucky will be punished.

No expenditure, policy or program is so stupid or wasteful that a majority won’t support it if it can be connected with Jesus and the Bible. Clearly, slashing education while subsidizing error and ignorance is being done to attract votes. And that’s because it DOES attract votes. Praise Jesus!

Let me rephrase my question -

I understand that this is the mentality of some people everywhere, but why, in Kentucky, is it not opposed by more people?

For example, I lived in New Mexico for a couple of years. That’s a small population state that, while admittedly ethnically more diverse, is just as poor and full of social pathology as Kentucky. In fact they do worse than Kentucky on a number of quality of life indicators. (If anyone’s stereotypes are challenged by this, please note that only a small fraction of the state lives in the rich mountainous Santa Fe/Los Alamos/Taos area in the north - the rest of the state is poor, and Albuquerque is the cultural capital of the rest of the state.) New Mexico is also more Catholic than most states, but Kentucky has plenty of Catholics. There is absolutely no shortage of creationists in NM.

But I’m positive that a policy that combined cuts to local schools, worthless road projects, and public funding of a boondoggle, even if an ostensibly “religious” boondoggle, would generate a lot of public irritation, even in some of the more impoverished, conservative, rural parts of New Mexico.

Strangely enough, people do not connect their votes with the actions the candidates take after they are elected.

I honestly do not know if it is ignorance, laziness, ideology, a feeling of powerlessness, or something else, but I do know that it is destroying our society.

Flint said:

Do you think these two groups are experiencing reduced gene flow between them?

:-)

LOL.

One would certainly hope so. I’m not sure what a hybrid would look like; but it might be sterile.

stevaroni said:

… how long does it take 4 men with soft copper tools to build an 8000 ton ark?

… the great wooden ships built during the heyday of sail took a good year to construct. In a yard employing hundreds, if not thousands of craftsmen. Who had all done this before. With effective tools and support structures like drydocks and cranes. And they could do it full time. They had a larger society that allowed them to not waste boat-building time farming or defending their flock from wolves.

And they had timber, not trees, to work with. Somebody already cut the trees down and dug the ore up and turned them into planks and nails and shiny brass fittings before they even got on-site.

And it still took hundreds of thousands of man-hours to build boats much smaller than the ark.

Mike’s comment about the previous ark threads did remind me I had promised myself a fuller look at www.worldwideflood.com Tim Lovett, whoever he is, has really has worked hard present a lot of data that is open to technical challenge, but as you suggested of his kind in your later post, he has no problem invoking the odd miracle when an engineered solution stretches even his self delusion beyond the limit. I’m almost tempted to dig out an old PC and run some of his executables from his “Games” section.

On your question of build time, he suggests (with reasoning) 120 years as most likely. Wooden warships may have taken a year to construct in ideal circumstances, but spending ten years on the (outdoor) stocks was not unusual, with rot consequently well established at launch. Ships did remain in service for long periods, but major rebuilds every 20 years or so were normally required. Allowing him a conservative 20 years for final fitting out after planking the decks, Noah likely went to sea in a boat that have spent most of the previous century as a water butt.

Woolwich Naval Yard employed over a thousand people in the mid eighteenth century to turn out about two major warships a year. (At well under 2000 tons each, lets be generous and say half an Ark) This would suggest your labour estimates are out by almost an order of magnitude, even if they only worked a forty hour week. Interestingly, the workforce had about 50 night watchmen to prevent the good citizens of Woolwich from pilfering the yard’s valuable materials, even though punishments for such crimes were likely to be Biblical in their severity. As there are no records of the town being wiped out by a Tsunami running up the Thames, it seems likely the residents were considered by God to be better behaved than Noah’s neighbours. TeamArk could not even have managed the security, let alone built the boat.

Dang, I waited through 152 comments, and none of the resident trolls showed up to defend the idea that “Oh yes it is possible to build an Ark just as described in Genesis, and have it perform as specified!”

Wonder why.

Just Bob said:

Dang, I waited through 152 comments, and none of the resident trolls showed up to defend the idea that “Oh yes it is possible to build an Ark just as described in Genesis, and have it perform as specified!”

Wonder why.

They’re out busily building an Ark?

Nah; they’re over at the Unimaginably Dense website. Too hot here.

Just Bob said: Wonder why.

They missed the boat?

Dang, I waited through 152 comments, and none of the resident trolls showed up to defend the idea that “Oh yes it is possible to build an Ark just as described in Genesis, and have it perform as specified!”

If they do show up I have another question: Wouldn’t all that time in near-total darkness seriously damage their eyesight? As I recall the trapped Chilean miners had to put on sunglasses before they emerged into the daylight. But I suppose Noah could have packed some aboard the ark for him and all the critters. What do you think?

This comment has been moved to The Bathroom Wall.

This comment has been moved to The Bathroom Wall.

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