North Menan Butte

| 15 Comments

Photograph by Matt W. Ford.

Photography contest, Honorable Mention.

Ford.North Menan.jpg

Wind-carved tuff formations on North Menan Butte, Snake River Plain, Idaho.

15 Comments

Wow, just wow!

Yep, she’s a real beaut alright.

Big sky, big butte!

Those of us who think the rainbow is more butte-ful when unweaved would like to know what geologic periods/epochs those layers represent. Any takers, or are you going to be like the “creationists” and play “don’t ask, don’t tell”?

Frank J said:

Those of us who think the rainbow is more butte-ful when unweaved would like to know what geologic periods/epochs those layers represent. Any takers, or are you going to be like the “creationists” and play “don’t ask, don’t tell”?

Tuff is volcanic ash, so there’s at least some chance that it was all chuffed out at the same time, in a single volcanic event.

Far far too grainy. Too bad as it looks like an interesting rock face.

Would it be possible to get a higher resolution version of that photograph somewhere? I like it a lot.

Further to Frank J and Flint:

Google is your friend. Try googling North Menan Butte. On the first page there is an item from Oregon State Uni:

http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/vwdo[…]_buttes.html

with more photos and a bit of backgropund. The buttes are on the Snake River Plain. To quote the page:

The Menan Buttes formed when a dike intruded into a shallow aquifer. The water turned to steam and explosively fragmented the basaltic magma. The cones are late Pleistocene in age.

According to Wiki (?!) the North and South buttes are late Pleistocene, 10,000 YBP (IIRC, dated back from 1950). This is supported by:

http://www.blm.gov/id/st/en/fo/uppe[…]n_butte.html

The mixing of basaltic magma and water would have caused a violent phraetic explosion. The 2 cones, North and South, are amongst the largest in the world.

More info. at:

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IO[…]php?id=48097

also from the first page in the Google search. Again, this supports the figure of 10,000YBP.

Far far too grainy.

I think what you call grain is an artifact of the 600-pixel width; nothing we can do about that. Just sit back a little farther. I doubt that the original is grainy.

Would it be possible to get a higher resolution version of that photograph somewhere? I like it a lot.

I will forward your request to the photographer.

Has my comment (around 8:45) got lost or is it in moderation?

Sorry. It has just turned up!

@alan bates.

Thanks. I guess that “proves” YEC. ;-)

Seriously, to my untrained eyes it looked like the layers of the Grand Canyon that sparked my interest in natural history, and soon after, evolution. So “naturally” I was hoping for Paleozoic or Mesozoic.

Jurassic Park?

It’s a wonder John Whitmore isn’t doing research on this in order to prove it was a flood deposit.

Maybe its a flood withdrawal instead of deposit?

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on April 30, 2012 12:00 PM.

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May 11, 2012: Science and Religion in the Classroom: Edwards v. Aguillard at 25 is the next entry in this blog.

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