His footprint will live forever

| 32 Comments

I was figuring he would live to be 120 so that he could see a Mars landing. But he did leave this:

Neil_Armstrong_Footprint.jpg

Neil Armstrong, first man on the moon, dies

32 Comments

(This may actually be Buzz Aldrin’s footprint but you get the idea.)

The differences between the bootprints of Armstrong and Aldrin are likely not great.

Glen Davidson

Damn. Just damn.

RIP Neil Armstrong. On a humorous note, the headline of an NBC News article about Armstrong’s passing away had been titled, “Astronaut Neil Young, first man to walk on moon, dies at age 82”. It has since been revised.

http://tinyurl.com/9e722fo

Sinjari said:

RIP Neil Armstrong. On a humorous note, the headline of an NBC News article about Armstrong’s passing away had been titled, “Astronaut Neil Young, first man to walk on moon, dies at age 82”. It has since been revised.

http://tinyurl.com/9e722fo

This right after another Armstrong, the world famous biker Lance, was disgraced.

dalehusband said:

Sinjari said:

RIP Neil Armstrong. On a humorous note, the headline of an NBC News article about Armstrong’s passing away had been titled, “Astronaut Neil Young, first man to walk on moon, dies at age 82”. It has since been revised.

http://tinyurl.com/9e722fo

This right after another Armstrong, the world famous biker Lance, was disgraced.

A sad coincidence!

https://me.yahoo.com/a/JxVN0eQFqtmg[…]X_Zhn8#57cad said:

The differences between the bootprints of Armstrong and Aldrin are likely not great.

Glen Davidson

Neil Armstrong was an avid and talented amateur photographer. He also made it a point to take a lot of photos. Aldrin, not so much.

Since Armstrongs pictures were much better, most of the astronaut photos you see from Apollo 11 are photos of Aldrin, taken by Armstrong.

I don’t know about the famous bootprint picture, but you you see a suit you can tell whos in there. Armstrong’s suit had the red mission commanders’ trim stripes.

I forget who made the point that when the first man walked on the Moon, it was an Armstrong, and watching them from the VIP podium were the President who’d sent him there, a Nixon, and his priest, a Graham.

The old border riding clans rode again in the moonlight, as they’d done before. But they went in peace, for all mankind. May it be so forever.

I remember laying on my grandparent’s rug, watching the moonwalks, unable to tear away from it. 9 years old, and totally hypnotized.

Sleep well, Big Neil.

Dave Luckett said:

I forget who made the point that when the first man walked on the Moon, it was an Armstrong, and watching them from the VIP podium were the President who’d sent him there, a Nixon, and his priest, a Graham.

The old border riding clans rode again in the moonlight, as they’d done before. But they went in peace, for all mankind. May it be so forever.

We were (are) quite proud of that in the Scottish Borders, more so about Neil Armstrong than the other two obviously.

From his family:

“For those who may ask what they can do to honor Neil, we have a simple request. Honor his example of service, accomplishment and modesty, and the next time you walk outside on a clear night and see the moon smiling down at you, think of Neil Armstrong and give him a wink.”

From JFK’s speech at Rice University, Sep 12, 1962:

“We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.”

JFK, Amstrong, Aldrin, all the the Apollo, Gemini, and Mercury crews and engineers and, more recently, the men and women at NASA JPL make me proud just to be of the same species as these wonderful people. Homo sapiens at their best!

For all mankind, indeed!

I was four at his walk and whether I saw it is unsure. my mom says I did. I saw the later ones. Once when i was a intern in D.C. I met a grand or great grandson of Armstrong. Only afterwards was this revealed however.

It truly was a great and cool and important thing for the moon landing. It was right for a American to be first representing american achievement and desire for the good guys winning. One of the three is famous in creationist circles for believing in the flood story and seeking for Noah’s ark. Not Buzz.

The landing was a important thing for many reasons i won’t get into. I don’t think landing on mars etc will be as important. like Lindberg you can’t beat being first. Sad for him and those who loved him or cared about him. They were men of spirit and courafge as it was dangerous.

I always felt a bit sorry for Collins.

Imagine going through life “I was this close.…”

I watched it with my family. We were enthralled!

dalehusband said:

Sinjari said:

RIP Neil Armstrong. On a humorous note, the headline of an NBC News article about Armstrong’s passing away had been titled, “Astronaut Neil Young, first man to walk on moon, dies at age 82”. It has since been revised.

http://tinyurl.com/9e722fo

This right after another Armstrong, the world famous biker Lance, was disgraced.

I believe neither one was related.

BobbyEarle said:

I remember laying on my grandparent’s rug, watching the moonwalks, unable to tear away from it. 9 years old, and totally hypnotized.

Sleep well, Big Neil.

I had the same reaction too, in my family apartment. May have been the first time that I, as a nine year old, stayed up very late just to view as much of the live footage as possible.

In memory of Neil Armstrong, the first human from the Planet Earth ever to walk on another world, the Moon. RIP Neil Armstrong:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aa5RwoFDCxc

corbsj said:

I always felt a bit sorry for Collins.

Imagine going through life “I was this close.…”

I’m betting he never thinks that. He might have been thinking that two people had a cooler job than he did, and 3.5 billion didn’t.

Robert Byers said:

One of the three is famous in creationist circles for believing in the flood story and seeking for Noah’s ark.

As usual, Byers is dead wrong about a creation-related fact–the area in which he considers his “knowledge” and “understanding” to be superior to that of scientists who work in the relevant fields. And here he has libeled the reputation of Michael Collins.

It was James Irwin, not Michael Collins who deeply embarrassed NASA by climbing Ararat looking for the Ark. In ‘82 he was injured so badly on the mountain that he had to be carried down. Why don’t creationists ever see misfortunes like that as warnings or punishment from their god?

Robert Byers said: One of the three is famous in creationist circles for believing in the flood story and seeking for Noah’s ark.

Yes. He’s also famous for never finding the ark, a boat the size of a WW-II liberty ship, despite rigorous, well funded, searches of an area completely devoid of any obvious hiding place for a 6000 ton pile of petrified gopher wood.

It’s tough to prove a negative, Bob, but if you’re thorough enough sometimes you can demonstrate that there’s no elephant in the room.

Michael Collins, for all his accomplishments, pretty much managed to do that, via several expeditions over the course of three decades.

More is the pity. Especially the fact that his faith seemed to blind an obviously otherwise smart and motivated man to any number of charlatans that were more than happy to help with his crusade for their personal gain.

Nick Matzke said:

(This may actually be Buzz Aldrin’s footprint but you get the idea.)

I looked it up.

This is actually Buzz Aldrin’s picture of one of his bootprints. He took it because some of the geologists had been particularly insistent that they wanted a picture of the cleanest, sharpest, footprint he could find. The scientists wanted to see how loose the lunar regolith was and how it would slump and clump when compressed.

Only later did anyone realize how iconic the image would become.

It was James Irwin, not Michael Collins who deeply embarrassed NASA by climbing Ararat looking for the Ark.

Dang. I knew that. Byers always makes me stop thinking. (which, ironically is what he wants for schoolkids everywhere)

It was James Irwin, not Michael Collins who deeply embarrassed NASA by climbing Ararat looking for the Ark. In ‘82 he was injured so badly on the mountain that he had to be carried down. Why don’t creationists ever see misfortunes like that as warnings or punishment from their god?

Just like Donna D’Errico embarrassed Baywatch by searching for the ark, and also being injured in the process.

OK, probably the Baywatch people really aren’t embarrassed by that.

Glen Davidson

Not to mention that even finding the remains of a wood structure wouldn’t in itself be evidence that it got where it was by floating…

Cottage industry in northern Turkey: haul old, weathered lumber up the mountain, then guide nutty Americans to “find” it.

Just Bob said:

Cottage industry in northern Turkey: haul old, weathered lumber up the mountain, then guide nutty Americans to “find” it.

Or Chinese Xians.

Any sucker’s a good sucker.

Glen Davidson

Just Bob said:

Cottage industry in northern Turkey: haul old, weathered lumber up the mountain, then guide nutty Americans to “find” it.

The 20th century equivalent of selling pieces of the true cross.

stevaroni said:

https://me.yahoo.com/a/JxVN0eQFqtmg[…]X_Zhn8#57cad said:

The differences between the bootprints of Armstrong and Aldrin are likely not great.

Glen Davidson

Neil Armstrong was an avid and talented amateur photographer. He also made it a point to take a lot of photos. Aldrin, not so much.

Since Armstrongs pictures were much better, most of the astronaut photos you see from Apollo 11 are photos of Aldrin, taken by Armstrong.

I don’t know about the famous bootprint picture, but you you see a suit you can tell whos in there. Armstrong’s suit had the red mission commanders’ trim stripes.

The stripes on the arms, legs, and helmet, were first used on Apollo 13. Their use was triggered by the difficulties in identifying whether there were any photos of Armstrong when the Apollo 11 film was first developed.

stevaroni said:

Just Bob said:

Cottage industry in northern Turkey: haul old, weathered lumber up the mountain, then guide nutty Americans to “find” it.

The 20th century equivalent of selling pieces of the true cross.

Actually, the reason they can’t find the Ark was that during the Middle Ages it was cut up to make fake fragements of the True Cross.

stevaroni said:

Neil Armstrong was an avid and talented amateur photographer. He also made it a point to take a lot of photos. Aldrin, not so much.

Since Armstrongs pictures were much better, most of the astronaut photos you see from Apollo 11 are photos of Aldrin, taken by Armstrong.

Actually, Armstrong and Aldrin only had one camera between them. Armstrong got it first since he was first on the moon and kept it for most of the time. Aldrin only got it briefly and when he had it Armstrong was working in the shade of the lunar module. So Aldrin’s few photos of Armstrong aren’t very good.

My father worked at the Cape as a computer tech, so I had the unique priveledge of watching the activity from close range. My play toys as a child were models of lunar modules and rockets, and books about astronaut training. I stood before the launch pad, in as much awe as a 5-year-old could muster. I watched test flights burn away from my backyard. I was the luckiest kid in the world.

Then I had the equally unique experience of watching the television broadcast with my maternal grandmother denying the entire time that any of it was real…

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This page contains a single entry by Nick Matzke published on August 25, 2012 2:05 PM.

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