Selasphorus platycercus

| 15 Comments

Photograph by David Young.

Ruby throated hummingbird at Aspen Highlands.jpg

Archilochus colubris Selasphorus platycercusruby-throated broad-tailed hummingbird, Aspen, Colorado.

15 Comments

I’m pretty sure this is a male Broad-tailed Hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus). You can see the rufous in the outer tail feathers, and Ruby-throated would be pretty unusual in CO. Broad-taileds are common in the Aspen area.

nlb.birder: You are correct!

They hum because they haven’t yet learned the words!

I’m pretty sure this is a male Broad-tailed Hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus).

Fixed, thanks!

…and a Lupine, possibly Lupinus polyphyllus?

I’m quite certain that’s a Salvia, probably Salvia farinacea or Mealycup sage.

Nice pic.

Paul Burnett said:

…and a Lupine, possibly Lupinus polyphyllus?

It can’t be a lupine, as a lupine has a bean-like flower (i.e., a compressed banana or shoe-shape wearing a bonnet).

lynnwilhelm is correct in that it’s a species of sage.

nlb.birder said:

I’m pretty sure this is a male Broad-tailed Hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus). You can see the rufous in the outer tail feathers, and Ruby-throated would be pretty unusual in CO. Broad-taileds are common in the Aspen area.

Ruby-throated’s are never found east of the Rockies.

The wings!!! I can almost touch them and expect them to be so smooth, so soft!

Beautiful!

Henry J said:

They hum because they haven’t yet learned the words!

At least they don’t stick their fingers in their ears and go “LA LA LA”.

Ah, but what if that’s just because they don’t have fingers? :p

Henry J said:

Ah, but what if that’s just because they don’t have fingers? :p

It that a design inference?

Henry J said:

Ah, but what if that’s just because they don’t have fingers? :p

Of course they have digits! They use their wings and bones as a crafty cat uses their front paws, or as the fish I feed my RES turtle to who also has 5 digits at the end of each of her appendages.

apokryltaros said:

nlb.birder said:

I’m pretty sure this is a male Broad-tailed Hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus). You can see the rufous in the outer tail feathers, and Ruby-throated would be pretty unusual in CO. Broad-taileds are common in the Aspen area.

Ruby-throated’s are never found east of the Rockies.

Did you mean to say west? If so, that’s almost correct. They do vagrate west of the Rockies occasionally. For example, California has 11 accepted records of Ruby-throated. But yes, their primary range is only east of the Rockies, as seen here: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/[…]mmingbird/id

What Hummingbird is mostly a gray body, with white tips on the tail and a green stripe down the back?

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on September 24, 2012 12:00 PM.

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