Photo Contest IV: Finalists, General

| 12 Comments

Update, noon, October 28: Voting is now closed. We will post the finalists in the Lab Rats category on Monday, October 29, at noon Mountain Daylight Time. We will formally announce the winners on Sunday, November 4.

1000 apologies for taking so long, but here are the finalists of the 2012 photography contest. We received approximately 30 photographs from 14 photographers. Most of the pictures were excellent. We divided the entries into 2 categories, Lab Rats and General, though we had to fudge a little bit to populate both categories.

Choosing finalists was difficult. We considered what we thought were the scientific and pictorial qualities of the photographs, and also attempted to represent as many photographers and present as much variety as possible. The text was written by the photographers and lightly edited for consistency.

Here are the finalists in the General category. Please look through them before voting for your favorite. You will have to be logged in to vote on the poll. We know it is possible to game these polls. Please be responsible and vote only once. If we think that the results are invalid, we will cancel the contest. The poll may be found below the fold.

The winner in each category will receive an autographed copy of Among the Creationists, by Jason Rosenhouse, which received a very favorable review here. We are indebted to the author for his generosity in providing the books.

Acknowledgement. Reed Cartwright wrote all the HTML code.

  • Moolack Beach, by Gerry L.—Oregon coast rock formation. Ms. L. writes that she "was surprised and mesmerized by this strange formation. (This might actually be just north of Moolack Beach. There are no street signs on the sand.)"
  • Volcan Tungurahua, Ecuador, by Lou Jost. Mr. Jost writes, "The pictures were taken from my kitchen window. I was inspired to enter today because this volcano was shaking my house again after several months of quiet. It is under close observation by a team of vulcanologists, and you can see the seismography in real time. Click on the first item (RETU) for the signal."
  • Comet Hyakutake, by James Kocher—Cuivre River State Park, Troy, Missouri, March 26, 1996. Ektachrome 800.
  • Agapornis roseicollis, by Pete Moulton—rosy-faced lovebird, Gilbert, Arizona. Mr. Moulton writes, "These little parrots have established a thriving population in the Phoenix metro area. ... Although [they] have been observed in the Phoenix metro area since the 1980s, the first actual census of this population wasn't taken until 2010."
  • Tyria jacobaeae, by Marilyn Susek—cinnabar moth.
  • Papilio glaucus, by Dragoness—dark morph of the eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly.

Which photo best captures both artistic and scientific beauty?

View results

12 Comments

I’m thrilled that one of my photos made the finals. I do have to say, however, that I’m very impressed with the volcano picture. Wow.

I was just hoping to win the book, but a nice consolation prize would be finding someone who knows something about the Moolack Beach rock formation and could tell me more about it.

By the way, it’s Ms., not Mr.

There is a fascinating document written in 1971 as a visitors guide to geology of the area that explains much about this engaging spot. It was written by Parke D. Snavely, Jr. and Norman S. Macleod back then for the State of Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. Snavely passed away in 2003 and has a USGS research vessel now named after him. “At the bottom of everything – and out of site – is a bedrock called the Yaquina Formation, which was created some 25 to 22 million years ago. It’s mostly sandstone and siltstone, with some volcanic rocks thrown in. Those rocks are similar to those of the Cascade Range. Parts of this formation apparently can be seen within the city limits of Newport, though geologists haven’t indicated where, and it could well be these are now covered up by buildings and streets.

Around 22 million years ago, forces beneath the crust here started warping the ocean bed downwards, and other materials eventually filled in this void.

This is called the Nye Mudstone and can be seen exposed along the northern part of Yaquina Bay, showing as olive-gray mudstone and siltstone, which weather into colors like a rusty brown. Fish scales and other tiny bits of fossils have been found here.” from http://www.beachconnection.net/news[…]0111_512.php

gerryprimate said:

I’m thrilled that one of my photos made the finals. I do have to say, however, that I’m very impressed with the volcano picture. Wow.

I was just hoping to win the book, but a nice consolation prize would be finding someone who knows something about the Moolack Beach rock formation and could tell me more about it.

By the way, it’s Ms., not Mr.

The Moolack Beach picture looks suspiciously like the Paluxy River dinosaur-and-human fossil footprints! [/snark]

By the way, it’s Ms., not Mr.

And she not he, no doubt. We need a special form of address for Mr. or Ms. and a special pronoun for he or she. At any rate: fixed!

O my!!! TQ for choosing one of my entries! That one was one of my favourites because she spent alot of time in that small butterfly bush inches away from me!

I really enjoyed our interaction! TQ!!! soooOOOOooo much for the recognition and good memories!

The other entries are FASCINATING!! I am so proud to be in a group of such talent! TQ Matt!!

Ye gods! I haven’t seen so many exclamation points since I read The Right Stuff!! By Tom (!) Wolfe!

LOLOLOL! lololol

Thank you, irascible judges, for picking one of my images!

https://me.yahoo.com/a/BJ8Cb2pws9_K[…]Ti22cfkc6oNQ–#53c93 said:

Thank you, irascible judges, for picking one of my images!

Ooops! Didn’t realize this ID would make me anonymous. Thanks again!

Pete Moulton

For sheer aesthetic beauty, the volcano wins hands down for me. It must be both amazing and nerve-wracking to live that close to it.

When we add in the scientific consideration, however, the choice becomes harder.

I have a soft spot for comets, and particularly this one. I personally missed seeing Hyakutake in its full glory when the region clouded over for the entire time it was at its closest approach, but I did see it as a smudge in the sky both before and after.

What is the surface the Cinnabar Moth is sitting on? The black patch to the left looks kind of like a fossilized seashell.

AltairIV said:

For sheer aesthetic beauty, the volcano wins hands down for me. It must be both amazing and nerve-wracking to live that close to it.

When we add in the scientific consideration, however, the choice becomes harder.

I have a soft spot for comets, and particularly this one. I personally missed seeing Hyakutake in its full glory when the region clouded over for the entire time it was at its closest approach, but I did see it as a smudge in the sky both before and after.

What is the surface the Cinnabar Moth is sitting on? The black patch to the left looks kind of like a fossilized seashell.

The surface is a sandstone gate post to our local St. Peter’s Church. Having to be quick to take the photo before the Cinnabar flew I didn’t notice the tiny hole till processing but something must have burrowed this tiny key hole and then something made it’s home there possibly a little spider as what makes it look like a shell is a tinny web.

I’m kind of sorry I could only vote for one!

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on October 22, 2012 12:00 PM.

Carbon dating to 50,000 years was the previous entry in this blog.

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