Erinaceus europaeus

| 30 Comments

Photograph by Sarah Boosey.

Hedgehog_600.jpg

Erinaceus europaeus, hedgehog, East Dereham, Norfolk, UK.

30 Comments

How long do you think it will be before someone makes a “Spiny Norman” reference?

Oh. Um… Nevermind.

Dinsdale?

The Americas would be cuter with them.

Glen Davidson

I see a lot of violet in that critter’s coat. Is it real?

Is it real?

Yes.

I did a project in London a couple of years ago and we had several of these that lived in the shrubs at the bottom of our “garden”.

They were quite tame. They even came out in broad daylight when we were around because they knew we were a reliable source of cheese.

I considered trying to bring one home, but I didn’t know if it would make a good pet. Well, that and the fact that smuggling a hedgehog might be… problematic.

stevaroni said:

How long do you think it will be before someone makes a “Spiny Norman” reference?

Oh. Um… Nevermind.

Scale?

:-}

fnxtr said: Scale?

That’s Luton in the background.

Drive carefully…

In response to the notion of, do hedgehogs make a good pet? My answer is no.

My son had one for a pet many years ago, and I can tell you that besides the fact you had better have some good leather gloves to handle the critter, it is one of those kinds of pets that Id classify as “one that has no interest in humans, and wants nothing more than to get away”

Kinda like hamsters and rabbits. There is no return on invested human emotion like you can get from a cat or a dog. A goldfish makes a better pet than a hedgehog.

Shelldigger said:

A goldfish makes a better pet than a hedgehog.

But I bet the family cat left it alone.

Are their quills really sharp? From what I could tell of the ones I saw, they seemed bristly, but not uber-sharp. I looked for dropped quills on the paths, but never did find any.

A couple of comments from someone in the UK:

“Do hedgehogs have a purple hue?” Maybe some of them do but I have yet to see any in England that aren’t muddy grey (sorry, “gray”) or brown. Try Google IMAGE. Are they different in the USA? Some of the objects in the undergrowth do seem un-naturally purple.

Rightly or wrongly hedgehogs have a mixed press in the UK. As with many species, if you introduce it into ecosystems that have no predators then you can have serious problems. That has been found when they were introduced onto a group of Scottish Islands. For example: http://www.mammal.org.uk/hedgehogs_on_uists

Alan Bates

https://www.google.com/accounts/o8/[…]TO1rKHmi8B-c said:

A couple of comments from someone in the UK:

“Do hedgehogs have a purple hue?” Maybe some of them do but I have yet to see any in England that aren’t muddy grey (sorry, “gray”) or brown.

That squares with my own experience, but it was in Sweden.

He or she does not look purple on my home computer or my notebook computer, but I noticed a decidedly purplish cast on a classroom computer. All have LCD displays. The picture would look a little bluish if taken on a cloudy day (a high probability in Norfolk), but I do not know why it would look so purple on some monitors.

I never saw a mauve hedgehog.

I never hoped to see one.

Now I must ask you this, o blog:

Are you putting me on?

(with apologies to Gelett Burgess)

Are you putting me on?

My sister, the photographer, sent me three pictures. One, labeled “Where’s the front end?” looked like a pincushion. The second, labeled “Blurry, confused,” was all of those things but showed signs that the hedgehog, not the camera, had moved (well, maybe both). The third, the one I posted, was labeled “Clear” and (apart from a slight haircut at the top of the frame) is not too bad a picture. The evidence suggests that the hedgehog was very much alive and perhaps even moving a bit too fast for my sister.

Matt Young said:

Are you putting me on?

My sister, the photographer, sent me three pictures. One, labeled “Where’s the front end?” looked like a pincushion. The second, labeled “Blurry, confused,” was all of those things but showed signs that the hedgehog, not the camera, had moved (well, maybe both). The third, the one I posted, was labeled “Clear” and (apart from a slight haircut at the top of the frame) is not too bad a picture. The evidence suggests that the hedgehog was very much alive and perhaps even moving a bit too fast for my sister.

I want to withdraw any inadvertent aspersions I may have cast. I think it’s a great picture, and I’m glad to have seen it. Thanks for posting it.

I should say that I often perceive deep purple-violet as rich brown and vice versa. The color issue may be part display, part color-encoding, part photograph, and/or part idiosyncratic perception.

If I had put in a little more thought, I might have come up with a less aggressive last line for that bit of doggerel. It was a clumsy attempt at light-heartedness.

If I had put in a little more thought, I might have come up with a less aggressive last line for that bit of doggerel. It was a clumsy attempt at light-heartedness.

I do not think you have anything to apologize for, except maybe that rhyme between “see one” and “me on” – but it is no worse than Alan Jay Lerner’s “bother me” and “rather be.”

I never saw a mauve hedgehog.

I never hoped to see one.

Now I must ask you this, o blog:

Are you showing me one?

(with apologies to Gelett Burgess)

phhht said:

Matt Young said:

Are you putting me on?

My sister, the photographer, sent me three pictures. One, labeled “Where’s the front end?” looked like a pincushion. The second, labeled “Blurry, confused,” was all of those things but showed signs that the hedgehog, not the camera, had moved (well, maybe both). The third, the one I posted, was labeled “Clear” and (apart from a slight haircut at the top of the frame) is not too bad a picture. The evidence suggests that the hedgehog was very much alive and perhaps even moving a bit too fast for my sister.

I want to withdraw any inadvertent aspersions I may have cast. I think it’s a great picture, and I’m glad to have seen it. Thanks for posting it.

I should say that I often perceive deep purple-violet as rich brown and vice versa. The color issue may be part display, part color-encoding, part photograph, and/or part idiosyncratic perception.

If I had put in a little more thought, I might have come up with a less aggressive last line for that bit of doggerel. It was a clumsy attempt at light-heartedness.

Getting colours right is notoriously difficult - this is why the Pantone Corporation exists. I can see a slight bluish tinge; perhaps it’s a reflection.

Perhaps the hedgehog’s name is Perkin.

(see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauveine )

They are quite sharp, and painful.

stevaroni said:

Shelldigger said:

A goldfish makes a better pet than a hedgehog.

But I bet the family cat left it alone.

Are their quills really sharp? From what I could tell of the ones I saw, they seemed bristly, but not uber-sharp. I looked for dropped quills on the paths, but never did find any.

They are quite sharp, and painful. While they appear to be somewhat large in diameter, which might suggest bluntness at the tip, I assure you, they taper to a fine, very sharp, tip. Maybe not quite cactus sharp, but close.

…and sadly because of their nature, all they do is look for a way out when allowed to roam, the hedgehog we had was confined to its cage for the time we had it. So, no interaction with the cat :)

Not to disagree with anybody who says hedgehogs don’t make good pets, just that there are other opinions on the matter.

I doubt I’d be much inclined to go for that as a pet, only that some people like hamsters and other critters that don’t really care for humans.

Glen Davidson

The Masked Panda Glen said:

Not to disagree with anybody who says hedgehogs don’t make good pets, just that there are other opinions on the matter.

I wonder how many of the world’s pet hedgehogs are named “Norman” or “Dinsdale”?

Or maybe “Spike”.

Matt Young said:

My sister, the photographer, sent me three pictures. One, labeled “Where’s the front end?” looked like a pincushion. The second, labeled “Blurry, confused,” was all of those things but showed signs that the hedgehog, not the camera, had moved (well, maybe both). The third, the one I posted, was labeled “Clear” and (apart from a slight haircut at the top of the frame) is not too bad a picture. The evidence suggests that the hedgehog was very much alive and perhaps even moving a bit too fast for my sister.

I suspect that the divergence theorem applies for hedgehogs.

If you integrate the divergence of the quills over the volume surrounding the hedgehog, it will tell you how much of the hedgehog you have captured inside.

Consider a perfectly spherical hedgehog…

Dave Luckett said:

Consider a perfectly spherical hedgehog…

And remember that you cannot comb a spiny hedgehog smooth.

If there was a wildlife category, I think this will go into that category.

Dave Luckett said:

Consider a perfectly spherical hedgehog…

You’re thinking of a topiarypig, dear.

I carrying hedghog-europeus girl as a pet.She is really pretty and cute.Feeding her whith „whiskas”,cheese and fresh meat,also she have clear water every day.She is not sleep in winter.For better skin I applyed to her Pantenol 1 time at week.I named her Mos’ka(or Mosya),she live free in my room,she know her toilel place.She is not slave like a dog,she is free as she can be in my flat,she is my frend. Interesting thing:in UV-light some of her needles shining red.More fresh needle - more shining red in UV-light.Discover it and check very attentivly and wisely - do not hurt hedghogs,please.

sorry, I look in translator - I named needles what you naming quills(part of them really shining red in uv-light). From Kiyv whith love to hedgies.

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on January 7, 2013 12:00 PM.

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