Eugenie Scott to retire from NCSE

| 9 Comments

The National Center for Science Education announced that its executive director, Eugenie Scott, will retire at the end of the year:

NCSE’s executive director Eugenie C. Scott announced on May 6, 2013, that she was planning to retire by the end of the year, after more than twenty-six years at NCSE’s helm. “It’s a good time to retire, with our new climate change initiative off to a strong start and with the staff energized and excited by the new challenges ahead,” she commented. “The person who replaces me will find a strong staff, a strong set of programs, and a strong board of directors.”

NCSE continues,

During Scott’s time at NCSE, she was honored with no fewer than eight honorary degrees as well as the Public Welfare Medal from the National Academy of Science, the inaugural Stephen Jay Gould Prize from the Society for the Study of Evolution, the Public Service Award from the National Science Board, and the Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

“It’s not going to be easy to fill the shoes of someone who has done so much to make NCSE into the respected and admired organization it is,” remarked Brian Alters, the president of NCSE’s board of directors. “We look forward with working with Genie to find the best possible successor.” A job announcement is now available; members and friends of NCSE are encouraged to spread the word that what Scott once described as “the best job in the world” will soon be open.

Science Insider (May 6, 2013) reported on the announcement, quoting Kenneth R. Miller of Brown University as saying of Scott, “She’s incomparable, irreplaceable, and indispensable,” and Sean B. Carroll of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute as saying, “The entire scientific community, legions of teachers, and millions of students owe her a great debt for her dedication and passionate advocacy. She has established a remarkable legacy at NCSE.”

I could not agree more – we all owe Dr. Scott our gratitude for her tireless and eloquent defense of science and rational thinking.

If you want the job, click here.

9 Comments

I had the great pleasure of meting Eugenie once. She is great spokesperson for science and a tireless advocate for science education. She will be missed.

Two possible replacements sort of popped into my mind after seeing that announcement; but I doubt that they would want to leave the jobs they currently have.

That would be Barbara Forrest or Robert Pennock.

I’m a believer and I consider Eugenie to be a very fair non-believer. She gets things done because she always puts science above ideology. She’s probably helped more kids get a good science education than even their own biology teachers. I got to hear her once, when she moderated “The Great Debate” at the American Museum of Natural History. I like Mike’s choices for her successors. Enjoy your retirement, Eugenie! I just wish I’d had the chance to go on her “two model” raft ride on the Colorado river–that would have been a hoot.

I can only hope that who ever takes her place generates as much ire, and consternation among the IDiots as she, wonderfully did.

Barbara Forrest as head of the NCSE would make the witch doctors clutch their mojo bags in terror.

Someone on t.o. suggested that Wilkins should be the head of the NCSE.

Ken Miller might be a good candidate. His wit alone would be a big asset, to say nothing of his record such as being the lead expert witness for the plaintiffs in the Kitzmiller legal case. But Miller already has a lot on his plate at the moment (a biology professor, co-author of a popular series of high school biology books, a popular speaker on the lecture circuit).

And he’s not getting any younger; he’s already in his mid-sixties.

Karen S. said:

I just wish I’d had the chance to go on her “two model” raft ride on the Colorado river–that would have been a hoot.

She will still be part of this summer’s ride at least.

It will be interesting to see if she continues this role for a little longer or hand over the reins. A little hard to imagine anyone else in her shoes.

DS said:

I had the great pleasure of meting Eugenie once. She is great spokesperson for science and a tireless advocate for science education. She will be missed.

If only she had taught you how to spell.

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on May 10, 2013 3:53 PM.

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