Ham to “share something” about Ark Park

| 90 Comments

Don’t hold your breath, but Ken Ham, who is in Nashville for a religious broadcasters’ conference, plans an announcement about the Ark Park.

I have a few media interviews lined up over the next couple of days to discuss the debate [with Bill Nye] and also to share something about the Ark Encounter.

Dare we speculate?

90 Comments

He won’t be saying that he has raised enough money for his idiotic ark park.

Karen S. said:

He won’t be saying that he has raised enough money for his idiotic ark park.

You never know. They might have gotten a flood of donations.

“We realize that it is wrong and unChristian to teach children utterly untrue things, along with techniques to use to avoid truth, so it’s a good thing that we never received the money for such a transparent sham.”

For another of the “we won’t hear” speculations.

Glen Davidson

ken shares a lot.

It’s how to get him to stop sharing that would be the trick.

Ham is an asshole, who is hated even by other Christians (CMI, ICR, Pat Robertson, the home schooling convention that kicked his ass out the door, theistic evolutionists whom he’s attacked, and, I suspect, Jason Lisle.) Sure he’s got corrupt Republican pols on the gravy train, but if you piss off everyone you come into contact with, sooner or later there’s no one left to lie to.

ksplawn said:

You never know. They might have gotten a flood of donations.

Somebody sent in a cubit or two?

Henry J said:

ksplawn said:

You never know. They might have gotten a flood of donations.

Somebody sent in a cubit or two?

What kind of cu-bit operation do you think they’re running? You can’t even buy a shave and a haircut for that anymore. Perhaps you meant qubit, meaning they have received a superposition of donations and not-donations?

Anyway, I hope they didn’t get any cubitcoin donations, what with one of the larger exchanges going offline recently.

Perhaps he’s going to announce that they’ve bought their first pairs of animals. Because of the “land of milk and honey” references, they’ve started with a pair of cows and a pair of bees.

Kevin B said:

Perhaps he’s going to announce that they’ve bought their first pairs of animals. Because of the “land of milk and honey” references, they’ve started with a pair of cows and a pair of bees.

Well, it does seem they’ll go to great lengths to get some media buzz …

Hmmm…I think the imported Ham learned something important from the debate. He learned that exposure, regardless of whether negative, positive or both is good for him. 1% of the population is 3,000,000. He is the ‘rap star’ who realizes a bad guy reputation enhances his sales more than harm them.

I think this announcement/ tease before the press release about the Ark Park is just that…gaining a larger audience and his announcement is not going to be liked by science promoters and those who see what a danger the likes of Ham is to reason and public education.

Maybe he is going to “share” the recognized limits of radio carbon dating. Seriously, why has no one called him out on his blatant dishonesty? Doesn’t anyone realize that he was lying? Doesn’t anyone know enough science to call “foul” when they see one? I can understand why the rubes would allow themselves to be fooled, but why would anyone else go along with such absurd nonsense? If a real scientist tried to pull the crap that he pulled, they would become an instant laughing stock, their reputation would be ruined and no one would ever trust them again. Why does lying for jesus get a pass? Every time he mentions the debate this should be thrown into his face.

If he did somehow manage to leverage the media exposure from the debate in order to fund his lie from the pit of hell ark park, I guess Bill is going to feel pretty stupid. Hopefully, he will be announcing that the project is now dead for good.

I’m betting the “announcement” will amount to little more than a money-beg.

I bet this bozo sells cheap Rolexes, too.

… a pair of cows

yeah, that’ll work!

usenettroll215 said:

HOW DO YOU EXPLAIN HOW HUMANS HAVE ORIGINS IN THE DEVONIAN?

I FOUND 3,000 FOSSILS FROM DEVONIAN STRATA FROM GREENLAND, AND THEY WERE SENT AND TESTED AT HARVARD AND FOUND TO BE 365 m.y.a. AND 100% HUMAN!

HOW DO YOU EXPLAIN THAT!

EVIDENCE FOR THIS MAJESTIC EVOLUTION DESTROYER CAN BE FOUND AT:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/alt.flame/L2xTnsOpA9E

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/sci.bio.paleontology/ggJHQiohh_8

DID you have them radio carbon dated?

DS said: DID you have them radio carbon dated?

He tried, but the samples were contaminated by excessive capitalization. When that happens, there is nothing you can do except throw them out.

eric said:

DS said: DID you have them radio carbon dated?

He tried, but the samples were contaminated by excessive capitalization. When that happens, there is nothing you can do except throw them out.

Really? He tried to prove that human remains were 365 million years old using radio carbon dating! Literally unbelieveable. Another Ham is born.

Checking a little on the web…seems the imported Ham received an award at the Nashville Convention Of Religious Broadcasters. Best Use Of Social Media.

Receiving the award for “Best Use of Social Media” at #NRB14 pic.twitter.com/mlyg9xoPQc https://twitter.com/aigkenham/statu[…]2353/photo/1

eric said:

DS said: DID you have them radio carbon dated?

He tried, but the samples were contaminated by excessive capitalization. When that happens, there is nothing you can do except throw them out.

And with this, eric wins the Internet.

Charley Horse said:

Checking a little on the web…seems the imported Ham received an award at the Nashville Convention Of Religious Broadcasters. Best Use Of Social Media.

Receiving the award for “Best Use of Social Media” at #NRB14 pic.twitter.com/mlyg9xoPQc https://twitter.com/aigkenham/statu[…]2353/photo/1

The comments do not appear to be complimentary. Is there an award for farce of the year?

DS said:

eric said:

DS said: DID you have them radio carbon dated?

He tried, but the samples were contaminated by excessive capitalization. When that happens, there is nothing you can do except throw them out.

Really? He tried to prove that human remains were 365 million years old using radio carbon dating! Literally unbelieveable.

Yeah, everybody knows radios weren’t invented back then!

ksplawn said:

DS said:

eric said:

DS said: DID you have them radio carbon dated?

He tried, but the samples were contaminated by excessive capitalization. When that happens, there is nothing you can do except throw them out.

Really? He tried to prove that human remains were 365 million years old using radio carbon dating! Literally unbelieveable.

Yeah, everybody knows radios weren’t invented back then!

Really? I seem to remember that the Flintstones had a car, a radio, a record player and a dishwasher. Of course they also had a pet dinosaur, so go figure.

DS said:

ksplawn said:

DS said:

eric said:

DS said: DID you have them radio carbon dated?

He tried, but the samples were contaminated by excessive capitalization. When that happens, there is nothing you can do except throw them out.

Really? He tried to prove that human remains were 365 million years old using radio carbon dating! Literally unbelieveable.

Yeah, everybody knows radios weren’t invented back then!

Really? I seem to remember that the Flintstones had a car, a radio, a record player and a dishwasher. Of course they also had a pet dinosaur, so go figure.

You’re kidding, right? The Flintstones obviously live in a post-apocalyptic world where the blue-collar survivors struggle to reclaim the technologies and lifestyles they lost in the global disaster. This includes the mutant reptiles they use to replace the small mammals they used to have as house pets.

Of course, the elites also survived, living in high-tech cities far above the wasteland below … they’re depicted in The Jetsons.

I wonder how many investors Noah conned into his “ark encounter,” knowing full well what their “payback” would be.

SWT said:

Kevin B said:

Perhaps he’s going to announce that they’ve bought their first pairs of animals. Because of the “land of milk and honey” references, they’ve started with a pair of cows and a pair of bees.

Well, it does seem they’ll go to great lengths to get some media buzz …

Pair of cows? Sounds like an udder failure.

You’re kidding, right? The Flintstones obviously live in a post-apocalyptic world where the blue-collar survivors struggle to reclaim the technologies and lifestyles they lost in the global disaster. This includes the mutant reptiles they use to replace the small mammals they used to have as house pets.

Of course, the elites also survived, living in high-tech cities far above the wasteland below … they’re depicted in The Jetsons.

My childhood suddenly makes so much more sense.…

Daniel Webb, a commenter at the Sensuous Curmudgeon, says

I just spoke with Zach Logan, a bond associate at Ross Sinclaire and Associates–the firm that has been organizing the Ark Encounter municipal bond sales.

He can be reached at 1-800-543-1831 or his cell 513-381-3939.

He stated that they were just wrapping up the bond issuing today [February 24], and that–-while he didn’t have all the final numbers–-it appeared to have been successful.

Ken Ham also stated in his blog today that he would have an announcement regarding the Ark Encounter in a few days.

Doesn’t look good, but still hoping that it wasn’t successful.

Presumably that means they have raised the $45.5 million, else the bonds would have to be called (and the money returned).

Surely the next project, after Ark Park, should be a new Tower of Babel. Much less is known about the Tower, so Ham and friends can get away with lots of design cheats.

But unlike a really big wooden boat that eventually rots, the rubble of a Tower that reached up to Heaven ought to be very evident to archaeologists. So where is it? It was built after the Flood. So you can’t use that excuse for not finding it. It was built of stone or brick, not wood that rots, so the rubble should be very evident. It wasn’t small, like a ziggurat, so the rubble pile should be HUGE. Where is it?

Inquiring minds want to know.

I think that the fact that the hambone could not build an ark that even floats for forty five million dollars is all the evidence that you need that a stone age family with no modern tools could not have produced such a vessel. If he does build the park it will be an monument to the absurdity of the entire story.

Would it be possible to find out exactly where the money miraculously came from so suddenly, since they are supposedly public bonds?

I think that the fact that the hambone could not build an ark that even floats for forty five million dollars is all the evidence that you need that a stone age family with no modern tools could not have produced such a vessel.

It’s also evidence of Ham’s lack of faith.

I don’t follow these things closely, but hasn’t Ham been defenestrated (figuratively) from various Australian and American creationist organizations, home-school associations, etc.?

He’s probably used to it by now.

SWT said:

Dave Luckett said:

And ah, the defenestration of Ham!

Since i don’t wish Ham any personal harm, all I can say is that I hope nobody finds a window of opportunity …

Ham and his minions will find that they need to open quite a few windows due to the smell of an Ark load of dung-generating “kinds”. Perhaps he’ll slip up and fall out of a porthole while slopping out.

But of course, I forget! Prior to Ye Greate Flud, there was no crapping allowed, and hence there were no bumholes on board the USS Ark. Yes sirree, coprolites are less than six thousand years old, as they fossilize very quickly.

The faithful will be able to buy ‘em fresh and by the boxed dozen from “Shem, Ham, and Japheth’s Holy Dunkin’ Donuts”, conveniently situated right next to a “Noah’s; World’s First Wine Merchant (Repented and Reformed)” outlet that declares it’s been “Proudly Selling Leaf Beverages for Four Millennia”. Every cup of tea will be “Infused with the Holy Spirit”.

I’d pay money to see that.

daoudmbo said:

SWT said:

Dave Luckett said:

And ah, the defenestration of Ham!

Since i don’t wish Ham any personal harm, all I can say is that I hope nobody finds a window of opportunity …

Not wishing harm on anyone, but still, “defenestration” is a great sounding word! (and could probably still be quite comical if it’s a first-floor window) :)

Didn’t Noah defenestrate both a raven and a dove?

A pen pal has reminded me that the Ark Park actually received 100 acres and a sum of money from the city, so they were not entirely truthful when they stressed that they got nothing from the city. It is true, however, that the city is not responsible in case of default.

Additionally, the Louisville Courier-Journal reports that AIG purchased “some” of the bonds themselves but gave no further information. It would be interesting to know how much is “some,” given that the Courier-Journal reports,

The Ark’s website says it has raised $14.4 million in private donations toward the $24.5 million needed to build the ark alone as part of a theme park that is expected to cost more than $120 million. The complete first phase totals more than $70 million, and officials said they sold most of the $62 million in municipal bonds offered to investors [my italics].

As soon I saw the “some”, I was curious about how much money AIG pumped into the park at the last minute. I would not be too surprised to hear AIG put in a third or more of the total $24.5 million.

I’m sure the AIG lawyers have looked over the situation very well and everything is on the up and up, but what is the legality of a non-profit entity giving to a for-profit entity when the same company has interests in both entities? That has got to get the attention of government agencies.

Kevin B said:

daoudmbo said:

SWT said:

Dave Luckett said:

And ah, the defenestration of Ham!

Since i don’t wish Ham any personal harm, all I can say is that I hope nobody finds a window of opportunity …

Not wishing harm on anyone, but still, “defenestration” is a great sounding word! (and could probably still be quite comical if it’s a first-floor window) :)

Didn’t Noah defenestrate both a raven and a dove?

And didn’t one of those birds come back with some fresh vegetation from a world where everything had drowned/cooked/froze/suffocated/etc.?

Americans United for Separation of Church and State weigh in on the latest news here

Didn’t Noah defenestrate both a raven and a dove?

Yes, and that strongly suggests that the biblical tale was woven from two different sources.

Kevin B said: Didn’t Noah defenestrate both a raven and a dove?

Language was so imprecise that long ago it might have been a bat.

Paul Burnett said:

Language was so imprecise that long ago it might have been a bat.

IIRC, one of the books* of the Pentateuch defines bats as birds, but I forget, are bats supposed to be clean or unclean birds?

* Probably Leviticus. Whoever Leviticus was, he really liked defining things, especially things that could be burnt or offered or some combination thereof, for pages, and pages, and pages.

Unclean. Leviticus 11:13-19, the last in the list.

Oh, and “Leviticus” means “that which pertains to the Levites”, that is, the priests. The book is mostly instructions for what and how things may be eaten and/or sacrificed, plus ritual observances and what passes for a legal code. There was nobody called “Leviticus”.

These are said to be the laws given by Moses from God on Mt Sinai, but it is plain that they are mostly concerned with people who live in houses in villages or towns and who farm land with fixed boundaries. They also assume a settled priestly class which is due a tithe of crops, and they refer to vines and olives. Of course we must assume that Moses knew the future, or at least that God did; but most of it would have made little sense to people who had been forty years wandering in a desert.

Marilyn said:

They don’t need to build the Ark to prove God to me like they said “Jesus is the door” it’s not walking into that particular Ark that is the door to salvation, that I know about. But I do hope people have a great time at the park, it seems to me to be a good family outing.

I hope there is more than one door though. I hope the design has been checked over thoroughly by the Fire Service Department.

Dave Luckett said:

Unclean. Leviticus 11:13-19, the last in the list.

Dang. Well, there goes Grandma’s favorite bat casserole recipe.

Dave Luckett said:

These are said to be the laws given by Moses from God on Mt Sinai, but it is plain that they are mostly concerned with people who live in houses in villages or towns and who farm land with fixed boundaries. They also assume a settled priestly class which is due a tithe of crops, and they refer to vines and olives. Of course we must assume that Moses knew the future, or at least that God did; but most of it would have made little sense to people who had been forty years wandering in a desert.

Leviticus also contains a number of instructions about washing, which is strange considering that these commandments were given in the Sinai wilderness (or some other desert place) where water was very scarce. Either these procedures were given for future use, as Dave suggests, or added later to the core commandments. Water is too precious in the desert to expend it in elaborate washing-up rituals.

Dave, I’m going to post a question for you about narrative markers on the Bathroom Wall. Nothing uncivil, it’s just off-topic.

Dave Luckett said:

Oh, and “Leviticus” means “that which pertains to the Levites”, that is, the priests. The book is mostly instructions for what and how things may be eaten and/or sacrificed, plus ritual observances and what passes for a legal code.

IOW, written by Levites, long post-exodus (if there ever was one) to justify their not working for a living, instead living off a cut of the sacrifices that everyone had to make or God would get ‘em.

Marilyn said:

Marilyn said: But I do hope people have a great time at the [Ark] park

I hope there is more than one door though. I hope the design has been checked over thoroughly by the Fire Service Department.

Interesting that you bring this up.

I’ve read reports by some visitors to the Creation “Museum” itself that stated they were a bit nervous that you were not allowed to visit parts of the building on your own (only with a tour guide leading a group) and if you tried to leave the group to go back, you were blocked by one-way doors. The question about one-way doors and fire exits was raised.

Now, I’m an ex-YEC that has never visited the Creation “Museum” so I don’t have first hand knowledge (I’m one of the few family that has not visited, most of rest of my family remain YECs or at least OECs). But I’d think that Kentucky (especially northern KY) would have very strong fire codes, especially in the wake of the horrific 1977 Beverly Hills Supper Club fire (which happened years before I was even born).

Could Ham of taken out a mortgage on the Creation pseudoMuseum to complete the financing?

Could Ham of taken out a mortgage on the Creation pseudoMuseum to complete the financing?

A pen pal of mine asked the same question and noted that AIG’s IRS Forms 990 (on GuideStar) do not exactly make it look as if they are flush with cash. Unfortunately, it is fairly expensive to examine the county records, unless you can physically go there.

Grant County News says that the Ark will be built; groundbreaking in May.

But that’s too late for them to avoid the deluge of April showers!

As of fiscal 2012, AIG had assets of around $17m. The source I found was at Charity Navigator dot org. They had a deficit too. (http://www.charitynavigator.org/ind[…]p;orgid=5214#.UxexMjK9KSM)

harold said:

Tenncrain said:

harold said:

Matt Young said:

Daniel Webb, a commenter at the Sensuous Curmudgeon, says

I just spoke with Zach Logan, a bond associate at Ross Sinclaire and Associates–the firm that has been organizing the Ark Encounter municipal bond sales.

He can be reached at 1-800-543-1831 or his cell 513-381-3939.

He stated that they were just wrapping up the bond issuing today [February 24], and that–-while he didn’t have all the final numbers–-it appeared to have been successful.

Ken Ham also stated in his blog today that he would have an announcement regarding the Ark Encounter in a few days.

Doesn’t look good, but still hoping that it wasn’t successful.

Presumably that means they have raised the $45.5 million, else the bonds would have to be called (and the money returned).

There is no chance that Ham will fail to raise as much money as he wishes. Whether he uses it to build the Ark thing eventually or just keeps stringing suckers along is his call.

We can, it seems, make some progress in things like preventing science denial from being enshrined in official public school science curricula.

As for purely private, legal ventures, there are just far too many stupid people for Ham to fail. (Yes, Ham has gotten some questionable involvement of rural local governments here, but he doesn’t depend on that.) All it takes is one million people to send 45 dollars each to Ham, and he’s got 45 million dollars. There are 300 million people in the US.

Ham probably believes himself at the conscious level, but unconsciously, he runs a brilliant scam, all the more brilliant for being something that can never be shut down. He craftily moved from Australia to a much larger market.

I regret to say that some of my relatives are among the most ardent supporters of AIG/ICR. This is even when I and a sibling and a few other relatives have abandoned the YEC bandwagon. Little I and other ex-YECs say sinks into them. Morton’s Demon is in control.

I started the long process of deconverting in 2005, so I’m one of the few in my family not to have gone to the Creation “Museum” but I admit that as a kid that I eagerly awaited in the mailbox (before the internet became popular, and my folks did not get internet on purpose to keep out blaspemous info) the latest issue of ICR’s publications such as their Impact articles.

Congratulations,

Thanks. I suppose the two biggest factors for me were my university intro geology class and also watching ID self-destruct during the Kitzmiller v. Dover trial.

However, my conversion was hard won and wasn’t overnight. I experienced both spiritual anguish as well as being looked down upon by other YECs.

and mild apologies for my use of the term “stupid” instead of the more accurate term “helplessly biased” in my original comment.

To be sure, there are some like Robert Byers that seem brain-challenged. But many are more a victim of wishful thinking even if they still use some quackery in their arguments.

I have been corresponding with a few YECs since I became an ex-YEC. One actually reads the mainstream science links I send and seems to use some reason in studying them; at times this person seems on the verge of at least becoming an OEC. But each time, this individual then retreats back to YECism. Frustrating.

But I suppose that is the lesser of the two evils compared to another YEC that admits that he refuses to even look at the links I send. He also does a FL in that even after I demonstrate how his YEC sources are flawed, bogus, etc (such as one YEC with a “PhD” actually got that degree from a diploma mill), he would come back a few weeks later with the same sources. And this is an individual that in some ways I think is smarter than I am.

I’m a “latecomer” to awareness of political ID/creationism; I became aware of it in 1999 during the original Kansas school board controversy.

Thus, ironically, although I never thought of it this way before, I am a product of the successful publicity campaign of the DI during the late 1990’s and early 2000’s. Although ID was not directly mentioned in Kansas in 1999, the activities of the DI were a major driver of that event, and almost all the supporters of the anti-science curriculum (which technically merely censored all mention of evolution) would spout memorized ID slogans.

(Technically I was quite aware of Jack Chick and old time fundamentalists, but had mentally categorized that stuff in the “people who obsessively believe in alien abductions or Sasquatch” mental category.)

So it’s quite interesting for me to learn of someone who saw the light since I became aware of this issue. In other words, I was commenting here while you were still a creationist.

There are now a couple of ex-YECs here on PT. Check out David MacMillan’s recent posts as well as Matt Young’s thread about David:

http://pandasthumb.org/archives/201[…]reation.html

It’s good to have David on our side.

Carl, a quick OT mention, but sincere thanks for your congrats elsewhere on me ending my bachelor days! I feel very fortunate, indeed.

DS said:

Over at AIG, the hambone is ranting about the new movie about Noah. Apparently it isn’t biblical enough for him:

http://blogs.answersingenesis.org/b[…]s-promotion/

I guess he just can’t stand the competition, or the thought that anyone else could make a movie without consulting him. Why would a fictional movie have to remain true to the bible? Why would it have to promote one particular religious view? Why does Ham think that he can dictate morality, ethics, history and entertainment to everyone else?

i guess Ham is afraid that people will get the wrong idea about the magic flood. Maybe he is afraid that they will think that god made a big mistake. Unfortunately, this movie will probably have the opposite effect. People will probably watch it and think that the flood was an actual historical event, after all, they saw it in a movie, so it must be real. Just like when Moses parted the Red Sea in the Ten Commandments. Right. I bet Ham didn’t like the E. G. Robinson character in that film either.

I was particularly amused that he cited the movie Ark’s landing place on the side of a cliff as one of his points of dispute, because the REAL Ark landed on Ararat. Talk about being nitpicky.

harold said:

Marilyn said:

They don’t need to build the Ark to prove God to me like they said “Jesus is the door” it’s not walking into that particular Ark that is the door to salvation, that I know about. But I do hope people have a great time at the park, it seems to me to be a good family outing.

It’s a terrible family outing. It misinforms about science.

A church picnic can be a perfectly good family outing. I’m not against Jesus or religion (I am against bad behavior in the name of those things, but that’s different).

There is no need to mix Christianity with dogmatic science denial that is rejected by most Christian theologians anyway.

Would it be legal to take a film crew into and through the Creation Museum and create a documentary/film series that systematically refutes every aspect of the thing?

Kevin B said:

daoudmbo said:

SWT said:

Dave Luckett said:

And ah, the defenestration of Ham!

Since i don’t wish Ham any personal harm, all I can say is that I hope nobody finds a window of opportunity …

Not wishing harm on anyone, but still, “defenestration” is a great sounding word! (and could probably still be quite comical if it’s a first-floor window) :)

Didn’t Noah defenestrate both a raven and a dove?

You win.

stevaroni said:

Paul Burnett said:

Language was so imprecise that long ago it might have been a bat.

IIRC, one of the books* of the Pentateuch defines bats as birds, but I forget, are bats supposed to be clean or unclean birds?

Aren’t fledgling (no pun intended) taxonomic systems cute?

There’s nothing terribly wrong with defining bats as birds if your taxonomic classification system for “bird” depends on whether something has wings.

Tenncrain said:

There are now a couple of ex-YECs here on PT. Check out David MacMillan’s recent posts as well as Matt Young’s thread about David:

http://pandasthumb.org/archives/201[…]reation.html

It’s good to have David on our side.

**blushes**

Just like when Moses parted the Red Sea in the Ten Commandments.

Not to mention that there were fifteen commandments to start with, but Mel Brooks Moses dropped the third tablet. Hey, that was documented in a movie!!!!

DS said:

Over at AIG, the hambone is ranting about the new movie about Noah. Apparently it isn’t biblical enough for him:

Eh. How does he know? Was he there?

Someone with more patience than I seems to subscribe to Ken Ham’s Facebook page and sent me the following, which I print with no comment:

I would like to introduce you to two pretty amazing kids. One a senior, and one a sophomore in high school. They have been homeschooled their entire education and are quite well read, as well as well travelled in that their father is a retired US Air Force pilot. These kids pooled their savings and purchased $5,000 worth of Ark Bonds.

This was their decision fully supported by their parents. A true widow and the mite story. For Hannah’s senior trip, she has chosen to visit the Creation Museum. The family will do so in May. I praise the Lord for the number of young people who are not only being impacted for the Lord by AiG, but are active in defending the Christian faith against the attacks by secularists and compromising Christians.

Matt Young said:

Someone with more patience than I seems to subscribe to Ken Ham’s Facebook page and sent me the following, which I print with no comment:

I would like to introduce you to two pretty amazing kids. One a senior, and one a sophomore in high school. They have been homeschooled their entire education and are quite well read, as well as well travelled in that their father is a retired US Air Force pilot. These kids pooled their savings and purchased $5,000 worth of Ark Bonds.

This was their decision fully supported by their parents. A true widow and the mite story. For Hannah’s senior trip, she has chosen to visit the Creation Museum. The family will do so in May. I praise the Lord for the number of young people who are not only being impacted for the Lord by AiG, but are active in defending the Christian faith against the attacks by secularists and compromising Christians.

When they realize that they have been taken by a cheap con artist they are going to be really pissed. Hopefully, that will happen sooner than later.

Matt Young said:

Someone with more patience than I seems to subscribe to Ken Ham’s Facebook page and sent me the following, which I print with no comment:

I would like to introduce you to two pretty amazing kids. One a senior, and one a sophomore in high school. They have been homeschooled their entire education and are quite well read, as well as well travelled in that their father is a retired US Air Force pilot. These kids pooled their savings and purchased $5,000 worth of Ark Bonds.

This was their decision fully supported by their parents. A true widow and the mite story. For Hannah’s senior trip, she has chosen to visit the Creation Museum. The family will do so in May. I praise the Lord for the number of young people who are not only being impacted for the Lord by AiG, but are active in defending the Christian faith against the attacks by secularists and compromising Christians.

I thought the bond offering was structured in a way that required any investors to have enough capital or income that they were considered “knowledgeable” investors. How did the kids qualify to make the purchase? (And for that matter, at least one of them–and perhaps both–would almost have to be under 18 and not able to legally sign the purchase agreement themselves.)

There is something fishy about the report… (Well…*several* things are fishy about it…)

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