Ark Park to break ground this month

| 92 Comments
ArkHammerPegCeremony_600.jpg

Grant County News said today, with some exaggeration, “Ark construction begins.” In fact, Ark Encounter had a “Hammer and Peg” ceremony last week; actual groundbreaking will begin later this month.

I watched the ceremony for 40 excruciating minutes in real time. You can see it here on YouTube. I thought it would have been a very nice ceremony, but for the fact that they were talking nonsense. Indeed, the video begins with a picture of Noah or one of his sidekicks driving wooden pegs into the Ark. Want to bet that the Ark Park will use plenty of steel in their Bronze Age structure?

92 Comments

The ‘Ark Park’ is to an actual ark as Space Mountain is to actual spaceflight.

How did they cut that flat surface into which the pegs are being driven?

How did they cut that flat surface into which the pegs are being driven?

The board and pegs in the picture are entirely ceremonial. They were fabricated from some trees on the property; I forget exactly what he said. I think, though, that if you go to the YouTube link, within the first minute or two, you will see some animations of Noah (or someone) using similar tools and pegs, and admiring his Ark through a window.

I wondered, in addition, how they would get such an enormous structure from the construction site into the water. I saw no sign, for example, of a drydock.

Matt Young said:

I wondered, in addition, how they would get such an enormous structure from the construction site into the water. I saw no sign, for example, of a drydock.

If you’ve got an ark, isn’t the water supposed come to you?

Carl Drews said:

How did they cut that flat surface into which the pegs are being driven?

My first thought was along similar lines.

I was wondering how long it would take someone to cut down that plank, dress the face of it, bore 7 nice holes, turn 7 smooth pegs and make up 7 mallets, using only early iron-age-tools. Which you’d also have to make yourself or perform a reasonable amount of barter labor to acquire.

There’s probably two solid man-weeks in that picture alone.

The absolute, willful blindness of Ark-y-types always boggles my mind.

Carl Drews said:

How did they cut that flat surface into which the pegs are being driven?

It seems to be round pegs in square holes. Not a good start.

Maybe I’m wrong, but… the log was cut flat and smooth in a lumber mill with a huge, steel circular or band saw. The pegs and mallet handles are standard 1” or 1 1/4” dowels from Home Depot. And the mallet heads are lopped-off sections of landscape timbers from the same source.

Yep, there’s plenty of symbolism there.

And I just love the perfectly clean, unscarred, soft, lily-white hands, the business suits, and what looks like the armrest of a wheelchair in the lower left.

That’s going to be one authentic ark.

Are they going to show the new “Noah” movie at the park?

Just Bob said:

And I just love the perfectly clean, unscarred, soft, lily-white hands,

Lily white hands.

That’s another thing the fundies always forget.

Noah was a middle-easterner, and, like Jesus after him, would have looked more like Yassar Arrafat than Ken Ham.

They’d have certainly been brown an Arabic enough to make them stand out suspiciously in a line of AiG fellows.

And, since we are all the spawn of those 8 members of team Noah that got off the boat, that means all those southern white creationists are actually descended from - gasp! - minorities!

I have a feeling that the creation “museum” had a lot of business due to curious onlookers. I hope more unbelievers will refrain from funding the ark park in this way. Maybe a trusted source should be appointed to tell the rest of us how cute it looks and let it fail on its own.

Name that tune ”””””

It’s too late to plug up those holes; their brains leaked out years ago.

Surprise! Surprise! “comments are disabled for this video”

Oh ye of little (and fragile) faith!

stevaroni said:

Carl Drews said:

How did they cut that flat surface into which the pegs are being driven?

My first thought was about whether this represented the technology that they were going to use to build the rest of the Ark. My first thought was along similar lines.

I was wondering how long it would take someone to cut down that plank, dress the face of it, bore 7 nice holes, turn 7 smooth pegs and make up 7 mallets, using only early iron-age-tools. Which you’d also have to make yourself or perform a reasonable amount of barter labor to acquire.

There’s probably two solid man-weeks in that picture alone.

The absolute, willful blindness of Ark-y-types always boggles my mind.

My first thought was about whether this represented the technology that they were going to use to build the rest of the Ark.

stevaroni said:

Just Bob said:

And I just love the perfectly clean, unscarred, soft, lily-white hands,

Lily white hands.

That’s another thing the fundies always forget.

Noah was a middle-easterner, and, like Jesus after him, would have looked more like Yassar Arrafat than Ken Ham.

They’d have certainly been brown an Arabic enough to make them stand out suspiciously in a line of AiG fellows.

And, since we are all the spawn of those 8 members of team Noah that got off the boat, that means all those southern white creationists are actually descended from - gasp! - minorities!

Noah was the father of Shem, Ham, and Japheth, who are the fathers of the three races, so Noah was not of any race. That’s one those “micro-evolutionary” post-Flood distinctions. I don’t what color Noah’s skin could have been - green?

Why do you refer to Noah as being a bronze age technician? According to the ICR all pleistocene sediments are post flood. We don’t even have pottery pre pleistocene or during the pleistocene, and the pleistocene ends before the bronze age. Beats me how they get a couple million years of sediments deposited in a few centuries after the flood. Noah was a contemporary of Methuselah, I don’t recall the Biblical references about how much technology they had developed when Adam and Eve had to figure out how to make clothes from animal skins.

TomS said:

stevaroni said:

Carl Drews said:

How did they cut that flat surface into which the pegs are being driven?

My first thought was about whether this represented the technology that they were going to use to build the rest of the Ark. My first thought was along similar lines.

I was wondering how long it would take someone to cut down that plank, dress the face of it, bore 7 nice holes, turn 7 smooth pegs and make up 7 mallets, using only early iron-age-tools. Which you’d also have to make yourself or perform a reasonable amount of barter labor to acquire.

There’s probably two solid man-weeks in that picture alone.

The absolute, willful blindness of Ark-y-types always boggles my mind.

My first thought was about whether this represented the technology that they were going to use to build the rest of the Ark.

Years ago on talk origins KSJJ claimed that it took Noah a hundred years to build the ark. This seems to be the same time line as the AIG. I think that Noah had to build a shelter around the ark to keep it from rotting away before he finished it, and/or it never rained in those days. He also had the ark supported up off the ground while it was being built. I don’t know if the supports were stone or they had to be replaced periodically.

Don’t they make toys for kids something like this, except smaller? A first toolkit!

Why do you refer to Noah as being a bronze age technician? According to the ICR all pleistocene sediments are post flood. We don’t even have pottery pre pleistocene or during the pleistocene, and the pleistocene ends before the bronze age. Beats me how they get a couple million years of sediments deposited in a few centuries after the flood. Noah was a contemporary of Methuselah, I don’t recall the Biblical references about how much technology they had developed when Adam and Eve had to figure out how to make clothes from animal skins.

In some of the stranger fundamentalist circles, they claim that amazing technology was lost because of the flood. btw, in the biblical tale God himself makes the clothing from animal hides.

Karen S. said: In some of the stranger fundamentalist circles, they claim that amazing technology was lost because of the flood. btw, in the biblical tale God himself makes the clothing from animal hides.

In their “fundamentalist” way, that appears to count as reading the Bible “literally”, part of what God’s “eyewitness” account tells us.

Karen S. said: In some of the stranger fundamentalist circles, they claim that amazing technology was lost because of the flood. btw, in the biblical tale God himself makes the clothing from animal hides.

Evidently it wasn’t that amazing, since none of it survived a couple thousand years, even in pieces.

There’s a very amusing, circular idiocy to this. In order to get around the problem of wood not being a strong enough building material, these fundies hypothesize ark supertech. This supertech didn’t survive the intervening millenia…yet we have wood that old.

eric said:

Karen S. said: In some of the stranger fundamentalist circles, they claim that amazing technology was lost because of the flood. btw, in the biblical tale God himself makes the clothing from animal hides.

Evidently it wasn’t that amazing, since none of it survived a couple thousand years, even in pieces.

There’s a very amusing, circular idiocy to this. In order to get around the problem of wood not being a strong enough building material, these fundies hypothesize ark supertech. This supertech didn’t survive the intervening millenia…yet we have wood that old.

For someone to take YEC seriously, one must be willing to accept all sorts of contradictions. It isn’t only that the science doesn’t work.

My favorite is the sorting out the fossils by the Flood. Whatever the mechanism that the Flood Geologists resort to, is means that the complex specified pattern of fossils, one which is consistent with evolution over long times, one which would could not occur by “pure chance”, one which would violate the creationist version of the “2nd law of thermodynamics”, and one which the Bible doesn’t have a hint about - well, that is what “hydrodynamic sorting” or whatever is supposed to produce.

TomS said:

…that is what “hydrodynamic sorting” or whatever is supposed to produce.

Gee, turbulence strong enough to do that would be pretty hard on a gigantic, all-wooden floating box, wouldn’t it?

Just Bob said:

TomS said:

…that is what “hydrodynamic sorting” or whatever is supposed to produce.

Gee, turbulence strong enough to do that would be pretty hard on a gigantic, all-wooden floating box, wouldn’t it?

Every once in a while, even though I have been interested in this so many years, someone mades a comment, and I can’t help but pause in wonderment about how mind-bogglingy stupid is YEC.

Thank you.

The Ark is being built right at the head of a narrow valley that channels air, the westerlies, to the valley below. Sometimes the breezes can be so strong as to cause damage. It’s quite possible that the Ark will be tall enough and wide enough to severely disrupt the westerlies.

Thus, we should be on the lookout for the following headline:

“Ark Park Breaks Wind”

TomS said:

Just Bob said:

TomS said:

…that is what “hydrodynamic sorting” or whatever is supposed to produce.

Gee, turbulence strong enough to do that would be pretty hard on a gigantic, all-wooden floating box, wouldn’t it?

Every once in a while, even though I have been interested in this so many years, someone mades a comment, and I can’t help but pause in wonderment about how mind-bogglingy stupid is YEC.

Thank you.

Ham even had Witcomb reading about the “specifics” of the flood from their holy book; fountains of the deep erupting, “canopy” suddenly becoming unstable and condensing.

Just thinking about the mechanisms involved in keeping a “canopy” in place makes no sense. If it was vapor, why didn’t it block significant amounts of sunlight? Why did the blackbody radiation from all that water vapor back towards the surface of the Earth NOT broil everything on the planet? Why didn’t that vapor load contribute to the atmospheric pressure? Superheated steam coming up from the Earth’s mantle would broil everything also.

The MINIMUM energy deposition onto the Earth’s surface would be the scenario in which all the water came down from outer space; something like 1.6 x 108 watts per square meter over every square meter of the Earth’s surface for 40 days and nights. In that case, the temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere and all that steam would climb to something like 11,000 degrees Fahrenheit.

A little further analysis demonstrates - when accounting for the energy going into the converting all that ice to steam and expanding the atmosphere and steam in the gravitational field of the Earth - that temperature rise would take place in less than week, and the pressure of the atmosphere loaded with all that steam would be over 800 atmospheres.

That’s the minimum energy scenario. Moving all that rock around to gouge out the ocean basins and pile up the continents and mountains of today would require far more energy. Imagine the tsunamis caused by the movement of all that rock. The rock would have to be molten in order to have frozen into the continental and mountain structures we see today.

An ark navigating in such huge tsunamis, in an 11,000 degrees Fahrenheit atmosphere, while hermetically sealed (with all those animals and their waste products inside) to withstand a pressure of over 800 atmospheres would have to be made of something other than wood.

And there isn’t an energy scenario that would be “gentler” than what the minimum energy scenario would be to the ark.

This is but one of the major problems with outfits like AiG. Their “science” is so bad, - and their “PhD scientists” have to bend and break every scientific concept in order to make them fit their sectarian world view – that the appeal can be only to the ignorant and fearful among us. Ham has apparently found his niche here in the US.

It is going to be interesting to see what they will discover when they try to make that wooden structure stand up on dry land; nothing will be “authentic” any more. Strength doesn’t scale linearly with weight. Any bets on the cheating that will go on?

Doc Bill said:

The Ark is being built right at the head of a narrow valley that channels air, the westerlies, to the valley below. Sometimes the breezes can be so strong as to cause damage. It’s quite possible that the Ark will be tall enough and wide enough to severely disrupt the westerlies.

Thus, we should be on the lookout for the following headline:

“Ark Park Breaks Wind”

Just the force of wind pressure alone on that structure will cause severe problems. Add those forces to the issues with the weight-to-strength ratios for a wooden structure of that size and it won’t be just the wind that breaks.

Evidently it wasn’t that amazing, since none of it survived a couple thousand years, even in pieces.

But it really was quite amazing! It was greater than any technology we have today, and yet magically vanished without a trace. (Maybe they left their amazing stuff in an unlocked camel?)

Watch out Ark Park! there’s a new Creation museum opening soon!

According to the Idaho Statesman,

A group of Idahoans dismayed by science education have opened the Northwest Science Museum offering a Biblical explanation of Earth’s origins and disputing other explanations, such as evolution.

I assume by “dismayed by science education”, they mean that science education actually exists, and this dismays them.

That’s OK, though, because, according to their website, they intend to teach the children such scientific gems as.…

“Skeptics say, ‘well, how could Noah bring dinosaurs on the ark if they’re that big?’ And I agree,” a curator tells two kids.

“But yet they found a baby diploducus in Argentina — a complete skeleton, 27 inches long,” he continues. “Noah, being the smart man he was … he’s going to bring a baby or young one along that’s gonna live longer, reproduce a lot more.”

According to the website, they one day intend to do all this in a building suspiciously reminiscent of Noah’s Ark.

At the moment, though, they’re only setting up a temporary museum in some dude’s basement, apparently while they cut down all the requisite gopher wood. Seemingly, they hope the museum will, of all things, evolve, into something big the future.

Seemingly, they hope the museum will, of all things, evolve, into something big the future.

Well, given the absence of intelligent design, what else can they do?

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This page contains a single entry by Matt Young published on May 7, 2014 2:47 PM.

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